Britain's Prime Minister and leader of the Conservative Party Theresa May delivers a statement outside 10 Downing Street in central London on June 9, 2017 as results from a snap general election show the Conservatives have lost their majority.
British Prime Minister Theresa May faced pressure to resign on June 9 after losing her parliamentary majority, plunging the country into uncertainty as Brexit talks loom. / AFP PHOTO / Justin TALLIS        (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images
Britain's Prime Minister and leader of the Conservative Party Theresa May delivers a statement outside 10 Downing Street in central London on June 9, 2017 as results from a snap general election show the Conservatives have lost their majority. British Prime Minister Theresa May faced pressure to resign on June 9 after losing her parliamentary majority, plunging the country into uncertainty as Brexit talks loom. / AFP PHOTO / Justin TALLIS (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:57
May loses political gamble in UK vote
LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 09:  Prime Minister Theresa May speaks outside 10 Downing Street after returning from Buckingham Palace on June 9, 2017 in London, England. After a snap election was called by Prime Minister Theresa May the United Kingdom went to the polls yesterday. The closely fought election has failed to return a clear overall majority winner and a hung parliament has been declared.  (Photo by Leon Neal/Getty Images)
Leon Neal/Getty Images
LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 09: Prime Minister Theresa May speaks outside 10 Downing Street after returning from Buckingham Palace on June 9, 2017 in London, England. After a snap election was called by Prime Minister Theresa May the United Kingdom went to the polls yesterday. The closely fought election has failed to return a clear overall majority winner and a hung parliament has been declared. (Photo by Leon Neal/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:52
How an extraordinary UK election unfolded
MAIDENHEAD, ENGLAND - JUNE 09:  British Prime Minister and Conservative Party leader Theresa May speaks at the declaration at the election count at the Magnet Leisure Centre on June 9, 2017 in Maidenhead, England. After a snap election was called, the United Kingdom went to the polls yesterday following a closely fought election. The results from across the country are being counted and an overall result is expected in the early hours.  (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
Matt Cardy/Getty Images Europe/Getty Images
MAIDENHEAD, ENGLAND - JUNE 09: British Prime Minister and Conservative Party leader Theresa May speaks at the declaration at the election count at the Magnet Leisure Centre on June 9, 2017 in Maidenhead, England. After a snap election was called, the United Kingdom went to the polls yesterday following a closely fought election. The results from across the country are being counted and an overall result is expected in the early hours. (Photo by Matt Cardy/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:29
Election shock undercuts UK on world stage
A graph on a trader's screen shows the fall of pound sterling that occurred when the first general election exit poll was released on June 8, 2017, as Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May is seen speaing on a television beyond, on the trading floor of ETX Capital in London on June 9, 2017, the day after Britain held a general election, in which the ruling Conservatives lost their parliamentary majority.
With Brexit talks due to begin in just over a week, Britain's shock election results may soften the government's strategy -- if there is even a government formed to negotiate in Brussels by then. The pound fell sharply amid fears the Conservative leader will be unable to form a government and could even be forced out of office after a troubled campaign overshadowed by two terror attacks. / AFP PHOTO / Glyn KIRK        (Photo credit should read GLYN KIRK/AFP/Getty Images)
GLYN KIRK/AFP/AFP/Getty Images
A graph on a trader's screen shows the fall of pound sterling that occurred when the first general election exit poll was released on June 8, 2017, as Britain's Prime Minister Theresa May is seen speaing on a television beyond, on the trading floor of ETX Capital in London on June 9, 2017, the day after Britain held a general election, in which the ruling Conservatives lost their parliamentary majority. With Brexit talks due to begin in just over a week, Britain's shock election results may soften the government's strategy -- if there is even a government formed to negotiate in Brussels by then. The pound fell sharply amid fears the Conservative leader will be unable to form a government and could even be forced out of office after a troubled campaign overshadowed by two terror attacks. / AFP PHOTO / Glyn KIRK (Photo credit should read GLYN KIRK/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:20
What the UK election means for the economy
Britain's Prime Minister and leader of the Conservative Party Theresa May delivers a statement outside 10 Downing Street in central London on June 9, 2017 as results from a snap general election show the Conservatives have lost their majority.
British Prime Minister Theresa May faced pressure to resign on June 9 after losing her parliamentary majority, plunging the country into uncertainty as Brexit talks loom. / AFP PHOTO / Justin TALLIS        (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images
Britain's Prime Minister and leader of the Conservative Party Theresa May delivers a statement outside 10 Downing Street in central London on June 9, 2017 as results from a snap general election show the Conservatives have lost their majority. British Prime Minister Theresa May faced pressure to resign on June 9 after losing her parliamentary majority, plunging the country into uncertainty as Brexit talks loom. / AFP PHOTO / Justin TALLIS (Photo credit should read JUSTIN TALLIS/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:37
'Let's get back to work': May's full speech
CNNI
Now playing
01:52
Corbyn: Make way for government for the people
Now playing
02:15
Theresa May: UK needs a period of stability
British Prime Minister Theresa May leaves 10 Downing Street in central London on April 19, 2017 ahead of the weekly Prime Minister's Questions session in the House of Commons. 

British Prime Minister Theresa May called on April 18 for a snap election on June 8, in a shock move as she seeks to bolster her position before tough talks on leaving the EU. MPs are set to vote on the motion following Prime Minister's Questions in the House of Commons. / AFP PHOTO / CHRIS J RATCLIFFE        (Photo credit should read CHRIS J RATCLIFFE/AFP/Getty Images)
CHRIS J RATCLIFFE/AFP/Getty Images
British Prime Minister Theresa May leaves 10 Downing Street in central London on April 19, 2017 ahead of the weekly Prime Minister's Questions session in the House of Commons. British Prime Minister Theresa May called on April 18 for a snap election on June 8, in a shock move as she seeks to bolster her position before tough talks on leaving the EU. MPs are set to vote on the motion following Prime Minister's Questions in the House of Commons. / AFP PHOTO / CHRIS J RATCLIFFE (Photo credit should read CHRIS J RATCLIFFE/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:14
Theresa May: What you need to know
LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 09:  Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn leaves his home on June 9, 2017 in London, England. After a snap election was called by Prime Minister Theresa May the United Kingdom went to the polls yesterday. The closely fought election has failed to return a clear overall majority winner and a hung parliament has been declared.  (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
Christopher Furlong/Getty Images
LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 09: Labour Leader Jeremy Corbyn leaves his home on June 9, 2017 in London, England. After a snap election was called by Prime Minister Theresa May the United Kingdom went to the polls yesterday. The closely fought election has failed to return a clear overall majority winner and a hung parliament has been declared. (Photo by Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:16
What to know about Jeremy Corbyn
Now playing
01:38
Nigel Farage: Theresa May is toast
Now playing
00:50
Labour Party leader: Theresa May a damaged PM
Now playing
01:56
Boris Johnson: Listen to our constituents
Now playing
01:46
UK election polls shock markets
A Union flag flies near the The Elizabeth Tower, commonly known Big Ben, and the Houses of Parliament in London on February 1, 2017.
British MPs are expected Wednesday to approve the first stage of a bill empowering Prime Minister Theresa May to start pulling Britain out of the European Union. Ahead of the vote, which was scheduled to take place at 7:00 pm (1900 GMT), MPs were debating the legislation which would allow the government to trigger Article 50 of the EU's Lisbon Treaty, formally beginning two years of exit negotiations. / AFP / Daniel LEAL-OLIVAS        (Photo credit should read DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images)
DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/AFP/Getty Images
A Union flag flies near the The Elizabeth Tower, commonly known Big Ben, and the Houses of Parliament in London on February 1, 2017. British MPs are expected Wednesday to approve the first stage of a bill empowering Prime Minister Theresa May to start pulling Britain out of the European Union. Ahead of the vote, which was scheduled to take place at 7:00 pm (1900 GMT), MPs were debating the legislation which would allow the government to trigger Article 50 of the EU's Lisbon Treaty, formally beginning two years of exit negotiations. / AFP / Daniel LEAL-OLIVAS (Photo credit should read DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:38
The year that rocked British politics
Britain's main opposition Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn waves as he arrives to address supporters at a campaign visit in Colwyn Bay, north Wales on June 7, 2017, on the eve of the general election.
Britain on Wednesday headed into the final day of campaigning for a general election darkened and dominated by jihadist attacks in two cities, leaving forecasters struggling to predict an outcome on polling day. / AFP PHOTO / Oli SCARFF        (Photo credit should read OLI SCARFF/AFP/Getty Images)
OLI SCARFF/AFP/Getty Images
Britain's main opposition Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn waves as he arrives to address supporters at a campaign visit in Colwyn Bay, north Wales on June 7, 2017, on the eve of the general election. Britain on Wednesday headed into the final day of campaigning for a general election darkened and dominated by jihadist attacks in two cities, leaving forecasters struggling to predict an outcome on polling day. / AFP PHOTO / Oli SCARFF (Photo credit should read OLI SCARFF/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:56
Jeremy Corbyn: The face of UK's Labour party

Story highlights

May has no control over Parliament ahead of crunch moment for Brexit

If she fails to quell anger among her own MPs, she could face leadership challenge

(CNN) —  

UK Prime Minister Theresa May, clinging on in Downing Street, will appeal for the support of her members of parliament (MPs) Monday, after losing the Conservatives a cherished government majority in last week’s election.

Many MPs are angry over what they see as an unnecessary vote that has cost several lawmakers their seats and are demanding she run a more open, collegiate government after her first months of a dictatorial regime.

With her government majority at zero, May has no control over Parliament a week away from the Queen’s Speech, when new laws are presented, and the scheduled start of Brexit talks.

Her only chance of an overall working majority is with the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP), a fringe political party in Northern Ireland, which is demanding a package of measures on finance in return for support in Parliament.

At one of its most important moments in its history, the country is rudderless and facing a constitutional crisis.

In throwing away her majority on an early election, May has lost control of the Conservative Party, Parliament, her policy manifesto and Brexit.

5 reasons Theresa May’s troubles have just begun

The clock is ticking

On June 19, the Queen, in traditional state coach and full regalia, will travel from Buckingham Palace to Parliament to unveil the new government’s legislative agenda.

On that same day, UK and EU officials in Brussels are due to start negotiations on Britain’s exit from Europe. May should be able to use these two set-piece events to shape the country’s future. Yet she no longer wields power over either.

It is even unclear whether May will be Prime Minister by this time next week.

The threat of a leadership challenge from inside her own party hangs over her head – a threat vividly underlined Sunday when her former colleague-turned-nemesis George Osborne labeled her a “dead woman walking.”

01:29 - Source: CNN
Election shock undercuts UK on world stage

So who is really in charge?

Over the weekend May, who appeared visibly shaken in TV interviews, used the one power that remains in her grip – a reshuffle of the Cabinet – to try to shore up her position and win allies.

But even in this her lack of authority prevented her from major moves or sackings. The most senior ministers stayed in post, while May was forced to bring back into the Cabinet one of her long-term political foes, Michael Gove, to appease an angry Conservative Party.

Michael Gove takes over as Environment Secretary in May's weekend reshuffle.
Chris J Ratcliffe/Getty Images Europe/Getty Images
Michael Gove takes over as Environment Secretary in May's weekend reshuffle.

MPs and ministers also feel they were treated disdainfully by May’s two chiefs of staff, Fiona Hill and Nick Timothy, who resigned over the weekend as the PM tried to make concessions.

If the PM fails to give a convincing performance to the backbench Conservative MPs on Monday, known collectively as the 1922 committee, she could face a leadership challenge within days.

Michael Fallon, the Defense Secretary who, for now, remains loyal, served notice Sunday that the PM had to start being more consensual when he said: “We’re going to see more collective government. I and other colleagues have made that clear to her.”

05:47 - Source: CNN
DUP 'only lifeline' for Theresa May after election

An alliance, at what cost?

Talks between the government and the DUP are due to restart Tuesday after confusion over the weekend whether an outline deal had been reached, but the Northern Irish party is in the driving seat as they know they are May’s only option of forming a government.

There are fears among more liberal Conservative MPs that the socially conservative DUP will demand a scaling back of abortion and gay rights – but No. 10 sources have insisted these issues are not on the table.

If May had won a majority last Thursday, she would have been converting the policy agenda in the Conservative election manifesto into laws in the Queen’s Speech. That power is now lost.

As the legislative package is being drafted this week, May is reportedly ready to axe key manifesto policies such as grammar schools and her controversial plan to reform elderly care – the measure that marked the turning point in her election campaign.

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn yesterday said his party would start drawing up its own policies for the Queen’s Speech, challenging legislation before it is even introduced, in a sign that every single vote in the new Parliament go down to the wire.

01:16 - Source: CNN
What to know about Jeremy Corbyn

Brexit: ‘Look again’

Finally, and perhaps most crucially, May has lost control over Brexit – the very reason she called an election three years early. With talks in Brussels just seven days away, it is clear that the plan for a hard Brexit, in which the UK severs all ties with the EU, including free market membership, is now in doubt.

Ministers have urged May to put forward a more “pragmatic” vision for Brexit rather than “ideological”, one that it less virulently anti-EU. This certainly means a softer Brexit is now on the cards.

Ruth Davidson, the leader of the Conservative Party in Scotland who is credited with a surprise win of 13 seats for the party there, said yesterday that the PM needed to “look again” at Brexit.

Davidson and the 13 Scottish Conservative MPs are travelling to Westminster Monday to underline their significance: without these seats May would have no chance of forming a government with anyone. But pro-Brexit Tory MPs will not let go of a hard Brexit without a fight: they are furious at any moves to water down something they see as the will of the British people.

With May’s dwindling authority over her party, Parliament, her manifesto and Brexit, it is no wonder that last night she failed to confirm whether she planned to serve a full term in office, telling Sky News: “I said during the election campaign that if re-elected I would intend to serve a full term.

“But what I’m doing now is actually getting on with the immediate job.” The question is, for how long.