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Story highlights

Trump tweeted several times Monday on the proposed travel ban from six Muslim-majority countries

Trump at one point was expected to nominate Conway to run the Justice Department's civil division

(CNN) —  

George Conway, the husband of White House counselor Kellyanne Conway and one-time top contender of a key Justice Department job, took to Twitter Monday to criticize President Donald Trump for his morning travel ban tweets.

Trump tweeted several times on the proposed travel ban from six Muslim-majority countries, saying his Justice Department should not have submitted a “watered down, politically correct version” to the Supreme Court. The Justice Department has repeatedly tried to distance Trump’s comments as President and during the campaign from its case looking to lift a legal ban against his executive order.

Later Monday, Conway said Trump hurt his case and made things difficult for the Office of Solicitor General, which argues cases before the Supreme Court.

“These tweets may make some ppl feel better, but they certainly won’t help OSG get 5 votes in SCOTUS, which is what actually matters. Sad.”

Conway confirmed to CNN that he sent the tweet.

Monday afternoon, Conway sent a series of tweets clarifying his views.

RELATED: George Conway pulls out of consideration for Justice Department job

“Just to be clear, and in response to inquiries, I still VERY, VERY STRONGLY support POTUS, his Admin, policies, the executive order and of course, my wonderful wife. Which is why I said what I said this morning. Every sensible lawyer in (White House Counsel Office) and every political appointee at DOJ wd agree with me (as some have already told me). The pt cannot be stressed enough that tweets on legal matters seriously undermine Admin agenda and POTUS–and those who support him, as I do, need to reinforce that pt and not be shy about it.”

CNN had been told previously Trump was expected to nominate Conway to run the Justice Department’s civil division, which handles legal challenges to major administration initiatives, or even solicitor general.

Conway last week took himself out of consideration for those posts last week, citing family obligations.