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Story highlights

Trump leaves for Saudi Arabia Friday

It's his first foreign trip as President

Washington CNN —  

Given his current political fortunes, if President Donald Trump’s crucial first foreign trip passes off without a disaster, it will be considered a success.

The President embarked on a journey Friday to Saudi Arabia, Israel and global summits in Italy and Belgium, after one of the most tumultuous and damaging weeks any President has had to endure.

The appointment of a special counsel to investigate whether there was any collusion between Trump aides and the Kremlin’s election hacking effort capped a stunning rush of events unleashed by the President’s firing of FBI Director James Comey, who declined Trump’s request to shield former national security adviser Michael Flynn in the Russia probe, The New York Times first reported and CNN confirmed.

It was a week that eventually could put Trump’s entire presidency in jeopardy and has left his White House dispirited, confused and at odds with itself.

Foreign trips, with their long flights, cumulative jet lag, high stakes and confined conditions can easily exacerbate tensions within White House teams, and the Trump camp is the most divided and acrimony-riddled West Wing in recent memory.

A giant billboard bearing portraits of President Donald Trump and Saudi Arabia's King Salman, is seen on a main road in Riyadh, on May 19, 2017.
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In fact, for some senior officials who have lost the President’s confidence, the tour may be a final chance to save their jobs.

“It’s kind of do-or-die,” said one official, referring both to the staff and stakes for the President.

As a result, Trump heads into his trip, an ambitious first stride across the global stage, pursued by a political maelstrom at home and facing questions from foreign leaders about the viability of his government.

“One question everyone outside the United States has, and are not likely to ask the President, is what is his actual political strength relative to the divisions with Congress, the problems within his own party?” said Anthony Cordesman of the Center for Strategic and International Studies.

“Can he move forward with his own agenda? That will certainly be a question as he visits any country overseas.”

Trump looked ahead to his odyssey, framing it as a chance to put into practice his “America First” foreign policy with a tweet.

“Getting ready for my big foreign trip. Will be strongly protecting American interests - that’s what I like to do!” he wrote.

01:12 - Source: CNN
Trump says his staff can't keep up

Significant test

The President’s debut foreign tour was always going to mark a significant test, given the challenging itinerary and his own complete lack of diplomatic experience. Foreign trips are a grueling proposition for even the most seasoned commander in chief – with their tedious summits and official dinners, stifling protocol and on-camera moments ripe for a misstep that can cause a diplomatic incident or ignite a political firestorm.

But the chaos that has raged around Trump since he took office, the difficulty his press team has in keeping up with his contradictory statements and tweets and his sheer unpredictability make this tour even more of a high-wire act.

Then there is the treacherous nature of the issues he must confront, from Middle Eastern power politics, Israeli-Palestinian peace talks, the future of NATO which he savaged on the campaign trail and European concern about the impact of his protectionist trade policies.

In addition, the sheer logistical challenge meanwhile of moving a President around the world is enormous. There is immense pressure on his advance teams of young, inexperienced staffers who negotiate the stagecraft of Trump’s encounters with foreign leaders and prepare agendas of meetings.

Any incident or comment that offends a host or appears to suggest that Trump is not up to the job or out of his depth could exacerbate concerns about his suitability for the Presidency that have been frequently raised during his four months in office. This week, he only further fueled concerns when The Washington Post first reported he spilled top secret intelligence in an Oval Office meeting with a Russian delegation.

And just because Trump is away from the United States, the barrage of blockbuster news stories about his administration is unlikely to stop, meaning that his harried staff will be forced to come up with crisis management strategies from many time zones away from the White House.

Trump’s reported griping about the length of his trip, and the fact that he has been severely distracted during his preparation time this week by the Russia storm, raises the stakes even more.

“I think he needs to keep his mind on what is going to be a very important trip,” said former secretary of state Madeleine Albright, a Democrat, on CNN’s “New Day” on Thursday. “He represents the United States, even if we are setting kind of a low bar for this trip – if he doesn’t make mistakes. I hope that there is not one single tweet about anything in the nine days he is gone.”

If the President wants to, he can use the trip as a way to break out of a debilitating period for his administration, to try to win some positive headlines for a change and even to engineer a morale boost for himself.

After all, his fellow foreign leaders are deeply curious about his agenda and, in Saudi Arabia and Israel in particular, are likely to want to make a positive impression. Trump is a collegial character who has spent extended time socializing with some visiting foreign leaders so he might actually enjoy the interaction. However, as a noted homebody, he might find it more difficult to relax in a foreign capital than at his Mar-a-Lago resort where he has hosted several foreign dignitaries.

’America First’

Trump’s aides acknowledge the trip will not erase the political turmoil back home. But they believe the seriousness of the issues Trump will confront can help realign the President. No one can guarantee he is ready to move on from blasting the Russia probe.

World leaders, however, are less likely to be interested in the details of Trump’s political woes than they are keen to gauge the impact of his “America First” policies on their nations, regions and alliances.

In Europe especially, they want to know whether Trump will pull out of the Paris climate accord and want to test his true feelings for Russia, which is seen as a threat in much of Europe.