Black Americans living longer, but racial gap remains, CDC says

Story highlights

  • Overall, black Americans are living longer, a new CDC report says
  • Many younger black people still have health conditions typically found in older whites

(CNN)When it comes to the overall health of black Americans, there's good news and bad news, according to a report released by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Tuesday.

The good news is that the overall death rate for black people in the United States has declined about 25% in recent years.
The bad news is that, although blacks are living longer, a racial disparity remains: The life expectancy of blacks is still four years less than that of whites.
    Younger blacks are more likely to live with or die from conditions typically found in older whites, such as heart disease, stroke and diabetes, according to the report.
    The new report included health data and age-adjusted death rates for black and white Americans from 1999 to 2015. Additionally, age-specific data and death rates were examined. The data were analyzed for age-specific trends among four adult age groups: 18 to 34, 35 to 49, 50 to 64 and 65 and older.
    The data came from the US Census Bureau, the National Vital Statistics System and the CDC's Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System.
    The data showed that from 1999 to 2015, death rates decreased significantly in both black and white populations, and the racial disparity in death rates between the two populations fell from 33% in 1999 to 16% in 2015.