Sessions
CNN
Sessions
Now playing
02:21
Sessions has no regrets for Hawaii slight
Now playing
05:18
Coinbase CFO: We're an on-ramp to the crypto economy
Now playing
05:18
Anderson Cooper explains how he overcomes being shy
CNN
Now playing
02:12
'Too dangerous to do anymore': Sacha Baron Cohen on Borat
Christopher Hamilton
Now playing
01:01
Volcanologist shares what he prefers to cook on lava flows
John Avlon 0413 Wallace
CNN
John Avlon 0413 Wallace
Now playing
03:31
Avlon compares Tucker Carlson's comments to George Wallace
Kristina Barboza
Now playing
03:09
Grieving mom's advice to other families: You can try to help, support and love
screengrab hong kong oscars
IMDB / Field of Vision
screengrab hong kong oscars
Now playing
02:50
Hong Kong won't air Oscars for the first time since 1968
Now playing
01:27
See the first community of 3D-printed homes
Burlington, MA Headquarters
Nuance
Burlington, MA Headquarters
Now playing
01:34
Microsoft to buy AI company Nuance
Now playing
02:50
Sleep doctor tells Anderson Cooper how long a power nap should be
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 01: Chairman of the Federal Reserve Jerome Powell testifies during a Senate Banking Committee hearing about the quarterly CARES Act report on Capitol Hill December 1, 2020 in Washington, DC.  Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin also testified at the hearing. (Photo by Susan Walsh-Pool/Getty Images)
Susan Walsh/Pool/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 01: Chairman of the Federal Reserve Jerome Powell testifies during a Senate Banking Committee hearing about the quarterly CARES Act report on Capitol Hill December 1, 2020 in Washington, DC. Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin also testified at the hearing. (Photo by Susan Walsh-Pool/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:06
Fed chief: The economy is about to grow more quickly
"Saturday Night Live" / NBC
Now playing
01:47
'SNL' sees Minnesota news anchors take on the Derek Chauvin trial
Now playing
02:23
Pubs in England reopen after months of lockdown
DORAL, FLORIDA - AUGUST 27:  A Trump National Doral sign is seen at the golf resort owned by U.S. President Donald Trump's company on August 27, 2019 in Doral, Florida. President Trump said the United States may host the next G7 gathering at the golf resort. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Joe Raedle/Getty Images
DORAL, FLORIDA - AUGUST 27: A Trump National Doral sign is seen at the golf resort owned by U.S. President Donald Trump's company on August 27, 2019 in Doral, Florida. President Trump said the United States may host the next G7 gathering at the golf resort. (Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
Now playing
03:46
'That is obviously false': CNN reporter on Trump supporter's attempt to rewrite history
Now playing
03:35
Why CrossFit CEO wants gyms included in infrastructure bill
(CNN) —  

Attorney General Jeff Sessions seems to have learned a very important lesson of Trumpworld in his three months or so as the nation’s top cop: Never, ever apologize.

Twenty four hours after referring dismissively to Hawaii as “an island in the Pacific” as part of a broader condemnation of the judicial blockade against the implementation of President Trump’s travel ban, Sessions was given a chance to revise and extend those comments.

He didn’t.

Here’s how Sessions responded to a question from CNN’s Kate Bolduan on Friday about whether his comments disrespected the judge (and the state):

“No, I think the island is a fabulous place. I’ve got a granddaughter born there. But I’ve got to tell you, it is a point worth making that a single sitting district judge out of 600, 700 district judges, can issue an order stopping a presidential executive order that I believe is fully constitutional, designed to protect the United States of America from terrorist attack. And I was just raising the point of that issue of a single judge.”

Bolduan tried another tack with Sessions. “Do you wish you had phrased it differently now?” she asked.

“I don’t know that I said anything that I would want to phrase differently,” Sessions replied. “No.”

And, scene.

Remember that Sessions knew beyond a shadow of a doubt that Bolduan would ask about his Hawaii comments when he agreed to the interview. Which means he had a clear strategy to not say “sorry” and to, in fact, double down on the idea that it was offensive to him that one judge could have so much power.

What’s fascinating to me about how Sessions handled this latest flap is how obviously it was influenced by his decision to recuse himself from Justice Department investigations regarding the 2016 election after it was revealed he had forgotten to make clear he huddled with the Russian ambassador on two occasions.

Trump insisted Sessions had done nothing wrong and had no reason to recuse himself shortly before the former Alabama Senator did just that. And, according to CNN reporting, it set Trump off. This comes from a March 6 CNN piece:

President Donald Trump is extremely frustrated with his senior staff and communications team for allowing the firestorm surrounding Attorney General Jeff Sessions to steal his thunder in the wake of his address to Congress, sources tell CNN.

“Nobody has seen him that upset,” one source said, adding the feeling was the communications team allowed the Sessions news, which the administration deemed a nonstory, to overtake the narrative.

Trump is a firm believer in a “no apologies” strategy on, well, life, the universe and everything. He believes apologies – or, in this case, recusals – make you look weak, embolden your enemies and fuel the story. Declare victory and move on is the Trump way,

Sessions clearly has internalized that Trump philosophy – likely as a survival tactic in dealing with his new boss. And, while his “no retreat, no surrender” approach with Bolduan on Friday won’t likely win him any new fans, it will endear himself to the only person whose opinion truly matters in the White House: Donald John Trump.