WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 18: Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, President-elect Donald Trump's choice to head the Environmental Protection Agency, testifies during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works on Capitol Hill January 18, 2017 in Washington, DC. Pruitt is expected to face tough questioning about his stance on climate change and ties to the oil and gas industry.   (Photo by Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images)
Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images
WASHINGTON, DC - JANUARY 18: Oklahoma Attorney General Scott Pruitt, President-elect Donald Trump's choice to head the Environmental Protection Agency, testifies during his confirmation hearing before the Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works on Capitol Hill January 18, 2017 in Washington, DC. Pruitt is expected to face tough questioning about his stance on climate change and ties to the oil and gas industry. (Photo by Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images)
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Story highlights

NEW: President says his actions will prevent job losses and government intrusion

President Barack Obama put in place a number of programs that tried to address climate change impact

(CNN) —  

President Donald Trump on Tuesday signed an executive order curbing the federal government’s enforcement of climate regulations, a move that represents a sharp reversal from his predecessor’s position.

The Obama administration put in place a number of programs that attempted to address the impact of climate change, including rising sea levels and temperatures.

Trump said those actions harmed American businesses.

“With today’s executive action, I am taking historic steps to lift the restrictions on American energy, to reverse government intrusion and to cancel job-killing regulations,” he said at an event marking the signing of the executive order.

Here’s a look at six climate change policies affected by Trump’s executive orders:

What Trump’s executive order on climate change means for the world

Climate Action Plan

This 2013 plan rolled out by President Barack Obama focused on three areas: cutting carbon pollution in America, preparing infrastructure for the impact of climate change and making the United States a global leader on efforts to combat climate change.

It also called for reduction of greenhouse gases, a strategy on methane and a commitment to protect forests.

Trump’s executive order rescinded the plan.

Executive order on climate change

Obama instructed the federal government to prepare for the impact of climate change in a 2013 executive order.

It created a Council on Climate Preparedness and Resilience, charged with overseeing such a national effort. The council was made up of representatives from across the federal government to work with a task force of state, local and tribal leadership also created by Obama’s order.

On Tuesday, Trump revoked Obama’s executive order.

Clean Power Plan

This 2015 plan limits carbon pollution from power plants.

It sets goals of reducing greenhouse emissions 32% from 2005 levels by 2030. It also requires states to meet specific carbon emission reduction standards based on their individual energy consumption and offers states incentives for early deployment of renewable energy.

The Clean Power Plan is not in effect pending a challenge in the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit.

Critics, including EPA Administrator Scott Pruitt, say it was the Obama “administration’s effort to kill jobs across this country through the Clean Power Plan.”

Under Trump’s executive order, Pruitt is to review three of the rules in the plan and decide how to deal with them.

Moratorium on federal coal program

The Obama administration placed a