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Story highlights

While donations came in before the election, they ramped up right after

The transition effort brought in more than it spent

(CNN) —  

President Donald Trump’s transition efforts raised more than $6.5 million, according to government filings, with the vast majority of the donations coming after the election – including thousands of dollars from people linked to his future Cabinet.

According to filings with the General Services Administration obtained by CNN through the Freedom of Information Act, Trump’s transition fundraising vehicle, Trump for America Inc., raised $6,513,947.93 through February 14.

Donors included individuals, corporations and advocacy groups. Each entity is by law allowed to donate up to $5,000 maximum to transition efforts, which are financed in part by private fundraising and in part by federal funds.

Trump Cabinet nominees or their families were consistent donors.

His earliest supporter of the Cabinet was Linda McMahon, who is now confirmed as chief of the Small Business Administration. She gave the maximum donation on July 14, before Trump was even formally named the nominee by the Republican National Convention. McMahon was nominated in December.

Wilbur Ross, expected to be confirmed as commerce secretary, maxed out on October 31. He was formally announced on November 30.

Other nominees waited until after the election.

The DeVos family gave 10 individual $5,000 donations on December 14. Betsy DeVos, now the secretary of education, was announced as the nominee on November 23.

Alan Mnuchin, the brother of Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin, gave $5,000 on December 9, though Steven Mnuchin did not donate. Exxon Mobil Corporation, the company that was helmed by Secretary of State Rex Tillerson before he was confirmed, gave $5,000 December 28 – though Tillerson himself did not donate to the transition. Tillerson was named December 13 and Mnuchin was named November 30.

Former Labor nominee Andrew Puzder, a fast food executive, gave $5,000 on November 30. He withdrew from consideration this month after a series of controversial headlines and opposition from GOP senators. He was nominated on December 8.

There is no indication that Trump or his decision-making inner circle would have known about the donations.

Asked if DeVos had any concerns about the appropriateness of donating, her personal spokesman Greg McNeilly said “no concerns whatsoever.” The Department of Education did not immediately respond.

The White House did not immediately answer an inquiry as to whether Trump or his staff knew about the donations.

Most cash came in post-election

Only $1.05 million of that came in by Election Day, according to the records, meaning $5.5 million came after Trump became president. The filings show Hillary Clinton actually outraised Trump before the election by $1 million.

More than $663,000 of the $1.05 million came before October 7, the day the hot mic tape of Trump bragging about sexually aggressive behavior toward women was released. The transition received no donations between October 6 and October 11, when they resumed.

While donations came in before the election, they ramped up right after.

For example, Financial Services Roundtable, a business friendly advocacy group for the financial services industry, donated $5,000 the day after the election. In the days that followed, American Coalition Clean Coal Electricity, Property Casualty Insurers Association of America, National Association of Wholesaler-Distributers and Independent Community Bankers of America (along with its PAC) all donated max amounts.

Major Trump donors trickled in before and after the election. Carl Icahn, a friend and adviser of Trump’s donated his $5,000 on November 7, the day before the election. Miriam and Sheldon Adelson, the billionaire Republican financiers, donated on January 9, along with daughter Shelley. The Mercer family, a big backer of Trump’s, donated meanwhile on September 27.

The transition effort brought in more than it spent. Trump’s transition spent $4.6 million, according to the filings: roughly $1 million on payroll and taxes, almost $2 million on travel and relocation and almost $1 million on legal and consulting services.

Before losing the election, the Clinton transition raised $2.1 million. It spent $1.4 million.

This story has been updated.