Africa

What will Africa be like for our children?

Published 6:21 AM ET, Fri December 16, 2016
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Optimism about health care and education for the next generation is on the rise in South Africa, Nigeria and Kenya, according to a new report by Pew Research Center.
Pictured here: school children sing to wish happy birthday to former South African President Nelson Mandela in July 2013 in Pretoria.
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Nearly seven-in-ten South Africans believe education will be better for their children, according to the survey.
Pictured here: a student walks to school in the town of Mthatha in the Eastern Cape in June 2013.
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Health care is another issue just over 60% of South Africans believe will improve for their children.

Pictured here: a mother gives out drinks to children who have lost parents to AIDS in Alexandra township in the north of Johannesburg in May 2012.
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A broad majority of South Africans (62%) think the country's economic situation will improve in the next year. The study further found black South Africans to be significantly more optimistic than mixed-race and white South Africans.

Pictured here, people walk in front of a Cash Loan shop in Marikana in April 2014.
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Nigerians are overwhelmingly positive about their country's future economic prospects with 86% believing the economic situation will leap forward in the next 12 months.

Pictured here, a customer withdraws Nigerian naira from an automated teller machine in Asaba, Delta State, in November 2016.
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This optimism extends to health care too, as nearly 90% of Nigerians believe health care will be better for the next generation.

Pictured here, a woman feeds her young baby suffering from severe malnutrition in the Gwangwe district of Maiduguri, the capital of Borno State, northeastern Nigeria, in September 2016.
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The survey further found 85% of respondents are optimistic about the education that the next generation of Nigerian children will receive.

Pictured here, a nursery school teacher uses learning aids at a school in Ibafo district in Ogun State, southwest Nigeria in November 2012.
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Seven-in-ten Nigerians say gender equality and poverty will be better for the next generation.

Pictured here, Muslim boys arrive with a prayer mat in Nigeria's central city of Jos to mark Eid al-Fitr in July 2015.
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Just over half of Kenyan respondents say the national economy will improve in the next 12 months.

Pictured here, protesters hold a fake bill imitation of local currency during a demonstration outside the parliament after lawmakers voted themselves hefty salary increases in June 2013 in Nairobi.
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Education is a big priority for Kenyans, with over 80% believing it will be better for the next generation.

Pictured here, pupils use the Kio tablet during a class sesssion in Kawangware, Nairobi in October 2015.
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A further 76% of Kenyans believe that when children today in Kenya grow up, health care will be better.

Pictured here, people walk past a kiosk where a poster on how to prevent Cholera is displayed in the Kibera area of Nairobi in May 2015.
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