Craig Sager, colorful Turner Sports reporter, dies at 65

Updated 4:51 PM EST, Thu December 15, 2016
Craig Sager at the 2016 NBA All-Star Game.
EDWARD M. PIO RODA/TURNER SPORTS
Craig Sager at the 2016 NBA All-Star Game.
Now playing
02:44
Craig Sager dies after battle with leukemia
PHILADELPHIA, PA - SEPTEMBER 17: Starter Roy Halladay #34 of the Philadelphia Phillies delivers a pitch in the first inning against the Miami Marlins at Citizens Bank Park on September 17, 2013 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Drew Hallowell/Getty Images)
Drew Hallowell/Getty Images
PHILADELPHIA, PA - SEPTEMBER 17: Starter Roy Halladay #34 of the Philadelphia Phillies delivers a pitch in the first inning against the Miami Marlins at Citizens Bank Park on September 17, 2013 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. (Photo by Drew Hallowell/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:26
Famed MLB pitcher Roy Halladay dead at 40
FOXBORO, MA - SEPTEMBER 16:  Aaron Hernandez #81 of the New England Patriots practices before a game against the Arizona Cardinals at Gillette Stadium on September 16, 2012 in Foxboro, Massachusetts. (Photo by Jim Rogash/Getty Images)
Jim Rogash/Getty Images North America/Getty Images
FOXBORO, MA - SEPTEMBER 16: Aaron Hernandez #81 of the New England Patriots practices before a game against the Arizona Cardinals at Gillette Stadium on September 16, 2012 in Foxboro, Massachusetts. (Photo by Jim Rogash/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:25
Aaron Hernandez found hanged
Frank Deford, editor and publisher of The National Sports Daily, holds a proof of the final front page of the newspaper after a news conference at the paper's offices in New York City on Wednesday, June 12, 1991.  He announced that the publication would fold with Thursday's issue.
SUSAN RAGAN/AP
Frank Deford, editor and publisher of The National Sports Daily, holds a proof of the final front page of the newspaper after a news conference at the paper's offices in New York City on Wednesday, June 12, 1991. He announced that the publication would fold with Thursday's issue.
Now playing
00:56
Longtime sportswriter Frank Deford dies
10 Dec 1994: COLORADO RUNNING BACK RASHAAN SALAAM WITH THE HEISMAN TROPHY AFTER BEING NAMED AS THE 60TH WINNER OF THE AWARD AT THE DOWNTOWN ATHLETIC CLUB IN NEW YORK CITY NEW YORK.
Jed Jacobsohn/Getty Images
10 Dec 1994: COLORADO RUNNING BACK RASHAAN SALAAM WITH THE HEISMAN TROPHY AFTER BEING NAMED AS THE 60TH WINNER OF THE AWARD AT THE DOWNTOWN ATHLETIC CLUB IN NEW YORK CITY NEW YORK.
Now playing
01:22
Heisman Trophy winner found dead in park
Andrew Redington/Getty Images/file
Now playing
03:32
Golfing legend Arnold Palmer dead at 87
Jose Fernandez memorial sanchez orig_00012925.jpg
Jose Fernandez memorial sanchez orig_00012925.jpg
Now playing
01:36
Cuban Americans, Jose Fernandez's story is our story
Courtesy University of Tennessee
Now playing
02:09
Legendary coach Pat Summitt dies
FILE- In this Nov. 10, 1963 file photo, the Detroit Red Wings' Gordie Howe (9)  acknowledges applause from the fans during a 20-minute standing ovation after he scored the 545th cgoal of his National Hockey League career at Detroit's Olympia Stadium, to set the leagues'  to set the all-time scoring mark. The NHL has the best names in the business. Nicknames, that is. Little Ball of Hate. The Great One. Tazer. Bicksy.  How is known as the "Mr. Hockey." (AP Photo/File)
AP
FILE- In this Nov. 10, 1963 file photo, the Detroit Red Wings' Gordie Howe (9) acknowledges applause from the fans during a 20-minute standing ovation after he scored the 545th cgoal of his National Hockey League career at Detroit's Olympia Stadium, to set the leagues' to set the all-time scoring mark. The NHL has the best names in the business. Nicknames, that is. Little Ball of Hate. The Great One. Tazer. Bicksy. How is known as the "Mr. Hockey." (AP Photo/File)
Now playing
00:48
Remembering 'Mr. Hockey'
Cassius Clay is a happy young man in his dressing room after knocking out Archie Moore in the exact round he predicted he would, the fourth, at Los Angeles, Nov. 17, 1962.  (AP Photo)
Eric Marrapodi/CNN
Cassius Clay is a happy young man in his dressing room after knocking out Archie Moore in the exact round he predicted he would, the fourth, at Los Angeles, Nov. 17, 1962. (AP Photo)
Now playing
01:31
Muhammad Ali dies at 74
Jonah Lomu obit thomas dnt_00013118.jpg
Jonah Lomu obit thomas dnt_00013118.jpg
Now playing
02:19
Rugby great Jonah Lomu dead at 40
yogi berra obit sanchez dnt nd_00002627.jpg
Getty Images
yogi berra obit sanchez dnt nd_00002627.jpg
Now playing
01:11
Baseball legend Yogi Berra dies at 90

Story highlights

Longtime Turner Sports sideline reporter Craig Sager has died of leukemia at 65

Sager was known for his passion for basketball and his over-the-top wardrobe

(CNN) —  

The suits and ties were so loud, at times they were screaming. But Craig Sager wore them so well.

Sager, the longtime Turner Sports sideline reporter best known for his colorful – and at times fluorescent – wardrobe, has passed away after battling acute myeloid leukemia. He was 65.

Sager died Thursday, just days after he was inducted into the Sports Broadcasting Hall of Fame.

He is survived by his wife, Stacy, and five children: Kacy, Craig Jr., Krista, Riley and Ryan.

“Craig Sager was a beloved member of the Turner family for more than three decades and he has been a true inspiration to all of us. There will never be another Craig Sager. His incredible talent, tireless work ethic and commitment to his craft took him all over the world covering sports,” Turner President David Levy said in a statement.

“While he will be remembered fondly for his colorful attire and the TNT sideline interviews he conducted with NBA coaches and players, it’s the determination, grace and will to live he displayed during his battle with cancer that will be his lasting impact. Our thoughts and prayers are with Craig’s wife, Stacy, and the entire Sager family during this difficult time. We will forever be Sager Strong.”

Sports world mourns

Social media was flooded Thursday afternoon with tributes to Sager, many of them from athletes he had interviewed.

“Craig Sager brought so much enthusiasm to the NBA game. But his fight to the end is what really impressed me. RIP to an inspiring man,” said former NBA great Scottie Pippen on Twitter.

“Long Live Craig. We love you! Rest in Paradise,” said former NBA MVP Kevin Durant.

“Words can’t explain how honored, humbled, and excited I was to be interviewed by a legend like you at this moment,” said reigning NBA Rookie of the Year Karl-Anthony Towns on Instagram. “The sports world will never be the same without you.”

The clothes

If someone didn’t know Sager by name, they likely knew him by his wardrobe.

With his bold, colorful and sometimes downright crazy combinations, seemingly nothing was off limits for Sager. He donned velvet, plaid, checkered, bright pink or deep purple. He wore ties with polka dots and flowers. The list of his sartorial flourishes was endless.

Charles Barkley once said that Sager looked like a pimp. During an interview, Kevin Garnett told Sager to go home and burn the suit – including the shoes and socks – he was wearing.

“There’s not any part I can keep?” Sager asked.

“Nope,” Garnett said. “Nothing.”

Sager’s approach at life matched his attire. It was all about elevating every moment.

But he also was known for something else. He spent more than 20 years as an NBA courtside reporter, and he was good at his job.

“He’s going to get the right question to the right person, and you can’t get around it,” former NBA player and current Turner Sports studio analyst Kenny Smith said. “No matter who you are, what stature you are in the NBA, from rookie to perennial All-Star, he’s going to make you answer the question.”

Colorful start to his career

Incredibly, Sager’s life had more color than his suits.

Born in 1951 in Batavia, Illinois, Sager was the Willie the Wildcat football mascot when he attended nearby Northwestern. After graduation, he went to Tampa in 1974 to apply for a job as a weatherman at a small station. To stick out at the audition, Sager purchased a blue, white and yellow seersucker suit from a Goodwill store. Sager got the job, but he was told to get rid of the suit. It clashed on TV.

That same year, Sager started working in sports. On April 8, 1974, when Hank Aaron broke Babe Ruth’s all-time home run record, there was Sager, who was working for an Atlanta Braves affiliate radio station in Sarasota, Florida, for $95 a week, among the people mobbing Aaron when he reached home plate.

His interviews with Aaron are in the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York.

“I don’t like to think I peaked at 22, but it would be hard to top a memory like that,” Sager said.

But there was more. A lot more.

In 1977, Sager slept in a stall next to Seattle Slew before the horse won the Triple Crown.

When Morganna Roberts, the entertainer known as Morganna the Kissing Bandit, was arrested for running onto the field at the MLB All-Star Game in 1979, Sager bailed her out. In return, she gave him her supersized bra.

While he was broadcasting Kansas City Royals games in 1981, Sager got a call from Ted Turner. Turner had recently launched CNN, and he wanted Sager to broadcast shows on baseball and basketball. Sager accepted and became CNN Employee No. 343.

Sager started doing sideline reporting for TNT in 1990. It was then that the colorful jackets and suits became his hallmark. He tried not to wear the same jacket-and-tie combination twice. He also owned more than 100 pairs of dress shoes.

“It’s not just the style. The color scheme is dangerous,” San Antonio Spurs head coach Gregg Popovich once told HBO’s Real Sports. “You have to be very careful – as you look at him, it can’t be too quick. It’s got to be slow, so your eyes can adjust.”

Popovich is notorious for loathing on-court interviews during games, saying it takes him away from his team. But when it’s Sager “that makes it livable,” he said.

Leukemia diagnosis

Over the years Sager covered almost everything in sports, from college basketball and football to baseball’s World Series and the summer Olympics.

But life for him changed on April 10, 2014.

Sager was working a San Antonio Spurs-Dallas Mavericks game in Dallas that night. But the reporter, who was known for being fit, didn’t feel right. He was unusually tired. After the game, Sager flagged down the Mavericks team doctor, who gave him a check-up and told him to go to the emergency room immediately.

The eventual diagnosis: acute myeloid leukemia.

Sager received a bone marrow transplant from his son, Craig Sager, Jr. During his father’s absence, Sager Jr. took to the sidelines during the NBA playoffs to honor his dad.

“I gotta tell ya, you did a great job but I’d rather have your dad standing here,” Popovich said. “Craig, we miss you. You’ve been an important part of all of this for a long time. We want your fanny back on the court.”

Sager missed 11 months before returning to broadcasting. When he worked a Spurs game again, Popovich once again showed his softer side.