chuck schumer cybersecurity sot_00000209.jpg
CNN
chuck schumer cybersecurity sot_00000209.jpg
Now playing
01:33
Sen. Schumer: Cybersecurity a bipartisan issue
(L/R): Head of Dutch Military Intelligence and Security Service Onno Eichelsheim, Minister of Defence Ank Bijleveld and British ambassador Peter Wilson attend a press conference of the Dutch Military Intelligence and Security Service (MIVD) at The Hague, The Netherlands, on October 4, 2018. - Dutch intelligence thwarted a Russian cyber attack targeting the global chemical weapons watchdog in April and expelled four Russian agents, the government said. The Russians set up a car full of electronic equipment in the car park of a hotel next to the Organisation for the Prohibition for Chemical Weapons in The Hague in a bid to hack its computer system, it said. (Photo by Bart Maat / ANP / AFP) / Netherlands OUT        (Photo credit should read BART MAAT/AFP/Getty Images)
BART MAAT/AFP/Getty Images
(L/R): Head of Dutch Military Intelligence and Security Service Onno Eichelsheim, Minister of Defence Ank Bijleveld and British ambassador Peter Wilson attend a press conference of the Dutch Military Intelligence and Security Service (MIVD) at The Hague, The Netherlands, on October 4, 2018. - Dutch intelligence thwarted a Russian cyber attack targeting the global chemical weapons watchdog in April and expelled four Russian agents, the government said. The Russians set up a car full of electronic equipment in the car park of a hotel next to the Organisation for the Prohibition for Chemical Weapons in The Hague in a bid to hack its computer system, it said. (Photo by Bart Maat / ANP / AFP) / Netherlands OUT (Photo credit should read BART MAAT/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:11
Russia denies western accusations of attacks
putin response russian spy lon orig bks_00003009.jpg
BBC
putin response russian spy lon orig bks_00003009.jpg
Now playing
01:30
Reporter confronts Putin about spy poisoning
The UK will expel 23 Russian diplomats from the country after concluding that the Russian state is responsible for the attempted murder of former Russian agent, Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia in Salisbury on March 4th.  They will have one week to leave.   "For those who seek to do us harm, my message is simple. You are not welcome here."
Bowtie TV
The UK will expel 23 Russian diplomats from the country after concluding that the Russian state is responsible for the attempted murder of former Russian agent, Sergei Skripal and his daughter Yulia in Salisbury on March 4th. They will have one week to leave. "For those who seek to do us harm, my message is simple. You are not welcome here."
Now playing
01:08
Theresa May: UK will expel 23 Russian diplomats
A Russian flag flies next to the US embassy building in Moscow on July 31, 2017. (MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images
A Russian flag flies next to the US embassy building in Moscow on July 31, 2017. (MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:04
Suspected Russian spy worked inside US embassy
 Steven Seagal (R) delivers a press conference with Costa Rican President, Oscar Arias (out of frame), on February 11, 2009, at the presidential residence in San Jose. Seagal and Arias met to talk about the possibility of real estate and film industry investments in Costa Rica. AFP PHOTO/ Mayela LOPEZ (Photo credit should read MAYELA LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
MAYELA LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images
Steven Seagal (R) delivers a press conference with Costa Rican President, Oscar Arias (out of frame), on February 11, 2009, at the presidential residence in San Jose. Seagal and Arias met to talk about the possibility of real estate and film industry investments in Costa Rica. AFP PHOTO/ Mayela LOPEZ (Photo credit should read MAYELA LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:30
Putin appoints Steven Seagal for diplomat job
russia new nuclear weapons putin chance lkl vpx _00002715.jpg
Russian Defense Ministry
russia new nuclear weapons putin chance lkl vpx _00002715.jpg
Now playing
01:09
Russia releases video of new nuclear weapons
SALISBURY, ENGLAND - JULY 05:  A police officer stands by a cordon in place at Queen Elizabeth Gardens in Salisbury after a major incident was declared when a man and woman were exposed to the Novichok nerve agent on July 5, 2018 in Salisbury, England. The couple, named locally as Dawn Sturgess 44, and Charlie Rowley, 45 were taken to Salisbury District Hospital on Saturday and remain there in a critical condition. In March Russian former spy Sergei Skripal and his 33-year-old daughter Yulia were poisoned with the Russian-made Novichok in the town of Salisbury. British Prime Minister Theresa May has accused Russia of being behind the attack on the former spy and his daughter, expelling 23 Russian diplomats in retaliation. (Photo by Jack Taylor/Getty Images)
Jack Taylor/Getty Images
SALISBURY, ENGLAND - JULY 05: A police officer stands by a cordon in place at Queen Elizabeth Gardens in Salisbury after a major incident was declared when a man and woman were exposed to the Novichok nerve agent on July 5, 2018 in Salisbury, England. The couple, named locally as Dawn Sturgess 44, and Charlie Rowley, 45 were taken to Salisbury District Hospital on Saturday and remain there in a critical condition. In March Russian former spy Sergei Skripal and his 33-year-old daughter Yulia were poisoned with the Russian-made Novichok in the town of Salisbury. British Prime Minister Theresa May has accused Russia of being behind the attack on the former spy and his daughter, expelling 23 Russian diplomats in retaliation. (Photo by Jack Taylor/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:02
Russia denies involvement in poisoning attacks
Reuters
Now playing
00:54
May: Nerve agent poisoning deeply disturbing
 A CNN team accessed the Malaysia Airlines flight 17 (MH17) crash site, July 30, 2014 and found evidence that there are still belongings at the site, including pieces of the plane .
Raja Razek/CNN
A CNN team accessed the Malaysia Airlines flight 17 (MH17) crash site, July 30, 2014 and found evidence that there are still belongings at the site, including pieces of the plane .
Now playing
00:49
Investigators: MH17 downed by Russian missile
Yulia Skripal poses for the media during an interview in n London, Wednesday May 23, 2018. Yulia Skripal says recovery has been slow and painful, in first interview since nerve agent poisoning. (Dylan Martinez/Pool via AP)
Dylan Martinez/AP
Yulia Skripal poses for the media during an interview in n London, Wednesday May 23, 2018. Yulia Skripal says recovery has been slow and painful, in first interview since nerve agent poisoning. (Dylan Martinez/Pool via AP)
Now playing
02:34
Daughter of poisoned ex-spy: Lucky to be alive
GOOGLE EARTH
Now playing
01:28
Russia blames Israel for strikes on Syria
CNN PHOTO ILLUSTRATION/GETTY IMAGES
Now playing
02:36
Why Hungary is looking more and more like Russia
A Russian flag flies next to the US embassy building in Moscow on March 27, 2018. (MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images
A Russian flag flies next to the US embassy building in Moscow on March 27, 2018. (MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:26
Russia retaliates, expels 60 US diplomats
Presidential candidate, President Vladimir Putin addresses the crowd during a rally and a concert celebrating the fourth anniversary of Russia's annexation of Crimea at Manezhnaya Square in Moscow on March 18, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / Alexander Zemlianichenko        (Photo credit should read ALEXANDER ZEMLIANICHENKO/AFP/Getty Images)
ALEXANDER ZEMLIANICHENKO/AFP/AFP/Getty Images
Presidential candidate, President Vladimir Putin addresses the crowd during a rally and a concert celebrating the fourth anniversary of Russia's annexation of Crimea at Manezhnaya Square in Moscow on March 18, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / POOL / Alexander Zemlianichenko (Photo credit should read ALEXANDER ZEMLIANICHENKO/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:35
Russia votes: How the day unfolded
Russian President Vladimir Putin delivers a speech during a meeting with Russian athletes and team members, who will take part in the upcoming 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympic Games, at the Novo-Ogaryovo state residence outside Moscow on January 31, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / SPUTNIK / Alexey NIKOLSKYALEXEY NIKOLSKY/AFP/Getty Images
ALEXEY NIKOLSKY/AFP/AFP/Getty Images
Russian President Vladimir Putin delivers a speech during a meeting with Russian athletes and team members, who will take part in the upcoming 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympic Games, at the Novo-Ogaryovo state residence outside Moscow on January 31, 2018. / AFP PHOTO / SPUTNIK / Alexey NIKOLSKYALEXEY NIKOLSKY/AFP/Getty Images
Now playing
03:47
How do you become president of Russia?
(CNN) —  

A bipartisan quartet of high-profile senators said Sunday that “recent reports of Russian interference in our election should alarm every American,” as President-elect Donald Trump sharpened his unprecedented attacks on US intelligence agencies.

The group – two Republicans and two Democrats – called for an investigation into American intelligence agencies’ conclusion that Russian hacking was intended to help Trump defeat Hillary Clinton.

“Congress’s national security committees have worked diligently to address the complex challenge of cybersecurity, but recent events show that more must be done,” said Sens. Chuck Schumer, the incoming Senate Democratic leader, Sen. John McCain, the Armed Services Committee chairman, fellow Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham, and Sen. Jack Reed, the top Armed Services Committee Democrat, in a Sunday morning statement.

“While protecting classified material, we have an obligation to inform the public about recent cyberattacks that have cut to the heart of our free society. Democrats and Republicans must work together, and across the jurisdictional lines of the Congress, to examine these recent incidents thoroughly and devise comprehensive solutions to deter and defend against further cyber-attacks.”

The letter is an implicit rebuke of Trump, who has questioned whether Russia actually interfered with the election, including with hacks of Democratic operatives. The President-elect on Sunday morning blasted the intelligence community anew, calling its assessment that Russia interfered in the election “ridiculous.”

“I think it’s just another excuse. I don’t believe it,” Trump said in an interview on “Fox News Sunday.”

Two days earlier Trump sided with Russia over the CIA and attacked the US intelligence assessment of Russia’s role.

“These are the same people that said Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction,” Trump’s transition team said in a terse, unsigned statement targeting the CIA on Friday.

“The election ended a long time ago in one of the biggest Electoral College victories in history. It’s now time to move on and ‘Make America Great Again.’” Trump won 306 electoral votes, a comfortable margin above the 270 necessary but in the lower percentage of presidential victories over two centuries.

Concerns

The transition team’s reference to the agency’s most humiliating recent intelligence misfire – over its conclusion that Iraq under Saddam Hussein had weapons of mass destruction – threatens to cast an early cloud over relations between the Trump White House and the CIA, whose assessments he’ll need to make monumental decisions.

The top leadership of the agency that presided over the Iraq failure during the Bush administration has long since been replaced. But the comments from Trump’s camp will cause concern in the Intelligence community about the incoming President’s attitude to America’s spy agencies. CNN reported last week that Trump is getting intelligence briefings only once a week. Several previous presidents preparing for the inauguration had a more intense briefing schedule.

The sharp pushback to revelations in The Washington Post, which followed an earlier CNN report on alleged Russian interference in the election, represented a startling rebuke from an incoming White House to the CIA.

Trump has also been highly sensitive to any suggestion that he did not win the election fair and square, including claiming that he is only trailing Clinton in the popular vote because of a huge trove of illegal votes – a claim for which he has provided no evidence.

On Sunday Schumer said his requested probe should reach beyond Russia.

“The goal is to find out how extensive it is, how deep this is, what countries are doing this – it won’t be limited to just Russia and then to come up with conclusions on how to stop it,” Schumer told reporters in New York City. “Our intel property in the government and some of our most important companies that employ tens of thousands of people in good paying jobs are hacked regularly. We have to look at all of this.”

CNN’s Stephen Collinson, Elise Labott and Vivian Kuo contributed to this report.