Health

How much sugar is your kid eating?

Updated 9:34 PM ET, Wed November 2, 2016
Share
01 Sugar Shoot01 Sugar Shoot
1 of 10
We took the most popular food brands among Americans, in nine categories young kids love, and used the current US dietary guidelines to illustrate what the daily recommended amount of sugar for kids looks like. Our math: Each of these images represents 33 grams of sugar. The recommendation is that added sugar should equal less than 10% of one's daily caloric needs. The median calories for moderately active 4- to 8-year-olds is 1,500 calories. So we calculated 9% of 1,500 as 135 calories, which equals 33 grams of sugar per day. If your child consumes what is pictured, they will probably have maxed out their recommended sugar intake for the whole day. Forrest Aguar & Michelle Norris for CNN
For a standard 12-ounce can of Coca-Cola, about four-fifths of the can equals 33 grams of sugar. Forrest Aguar & Michelle Norris for CNN
For a standard 6-ounce container of Yoplait yogurt (strawberry), one plus four-fifths of another equals 33 grams of sugar. Forrest Aguar & Michelle Norris for CNN
For a 20-ounce bottle of Gatorade, there are 33 grams of sugar in about 97% of the bottle. Forrest Aguar & Michelle Norris for CNN
For an 8-ounce bottle of Nesquik low-fat chocolate milk, one and a half bottles equals 33 grams of sugar. Forrest Aguar & Michelle Norris for CNN
For a 6.75-ounce carton of Mott's apple juice, one plus another two-fifths of a carton equals 33 grams of sugar. Forrest Aguar & Michelle Norris for CNN
For a 0.9 oz bag of Welch's Mixed Fruit snacks, there are 33 grams of sugar in three bags. Forrest Aguar & Michelle Norris for CNN
For Chips Ahoy chocolate chip cookies, nine cookies equal 33 grams of sugar. Forrest Aguar & Michelle Norris for CNN
For Honey Nut Cheerios, three plus two-thirds servings equals 33 grams of sugar. (One serving is three-quarters of a cup.) Forrest Aguar & Michelle Norris for CNN
For a standard 52.7-gram Snickers, one plus one-fifth of a bar equals 33 grams of sugar. Forrest Aguar & Michelle Norris for CNN