Tires burn as armed soldiers and law enforcement officers stand in formation on Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016, to force Dakota Access pipeline protesters off private land where they had camped to block construction. The pipeline is to carry oil from western North Dakota through South Dakota and Iowa to an existing pipeline in Patoka, Ill. (Mike McCleary/The Bismarck Tribune via AP)
Mike McCleary/AP
Tires burn as armed soldiers and law enforcement officers stand in formation on Thursday, Oct. 27, 2016, to force Dakota Access pipeline protesters off private land where they had camped to block construction. The pipeline is to carry oil from western North Dakota through South Dakota and Iowa to an existing pipeline in Patoka, Ill. (Mike McCleary/The Bismarck Tribune via AP)
Now playing
01:21
What's up with the Dakota Access Pipeline?
dakota access pipeline protesters remain jpm orig_00010112.jpg
dakota access pipeline protesters remain jpm orig_00010112.jpg
Now playing
02:32
Dakota pipeline protesters' last stand
US Navy veteran John Gutekanst from Athens, Ohio, waves an American flag as an activist approaches the police barricade with his hands up on a bridge near Oceti Sakowin Camp on the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on December 4, 2016 outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota.
Native Americans and activists from around the country gather at the camp trying to halt the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline.  / AFP / JIM WATSON        (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
JIM WATSON/AFP/AFP/Getty Images
US Navy veteran John Gutekanst from Athens, Ohio, waves an American flag as an activist approaches the police barricade with his hands up on a bridge near Oceti Sakowin Camp on the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on December 4, 2016 outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Native Americans and activists from around the country gather at the camp trying to halt the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. / AFP / JIM WATSON (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:20
Police have their say about Standing Rock
Now playing
01:09
Veterans stand in solidarity in Standing Rock
CANNON BALL, ND - DECEMBER 05:  Military veterans are briefed on cold-weather safety issues and their overall role at Oceti Sakowin Camp on the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on December 5, 2016 outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Over the weekend a large group of military veterans joined native Americans and activists from around the country who have been at the camp for several months trying to halt the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. Yesterday the US Army Corps of Engineers announced that it will not grant an easement for the pipeline to cross under a lake on the Sioux Tribes Standing Rock reservation. The proposed 1,172-mile-long pipeline would transport oil from the North Dakota Bakken region through South Dakota, Iowa and into Illinois.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Scott Olson/Getty Images North America/Getty Images
CANNON BALL, ND - DECEMBER 05: Military veterans are briefed on cold-weather safety issues and their overall role at Oceti Sakowin Camp on the edge of the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on December 5, 2016 outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Over the weekend a large group of military veterans joined native Americans and activists from around the country who have been at the camp for several months trying to halt the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. Yesterday the US Army Corps of Engineers announced that it will not grant an easement for the pipeline to cross under a lake on the Sioux Tribes Standing Rock reservation. The proposed 1,172-mile-long pipeline would transport oil from the North Dakota Bakken region through South Dakota, Iowa and into Illinois. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Now playing
00:55
Protesters stand strong despite blizzard
Now playing
02:37
Dakota Access Pipeline fight isn't over
Now playing
03:11
Victory for Native Americans in pipeline fight
A crowd celebrates at the Oceti Sakowin camp after it was announced that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers won't grant easement for the Dakota Access oil pipeline in Cannon Ball, N.D., Sunday, Dec. 4, 2016. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
David Goldman/AP
A crowd celebrates at the Oceti Sakowin camp after it was announced that the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers won't grant easement for the Dakota Access oil pipeline in Cannon Ball, N.D., Sunday, Dec. 4, 2016. (AP Photo/David Goldman)
Now playing
00:55
Drumming, chanting over Dakota pipeline halt
dakota pipeline Tribe Announcement sot _00000000.jpg
dakota pipeline Tribe Announcement sot _00000000.jpg
Now playing
00:46
Tribe chief on Dakota pipeline: 'We made it'
CANNON BALL, ND - NOVEMBER 30:  Snow covers Oceti Sakowin Camp near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on November 30, 2016 outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Native Americans and activists from around the country have been gathering at the camp for several months trying to halt the construction of the  Dakota Access Pipeline. The proposed 1,172 mile long pipeline would transport oil from the North Dakota Bakken region through South Dakota, Iowa and into Illinois.  (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Scott Olson/Getty Images
CANNON BALL, ND - NOVEMBER 30: Snow covers Oceti Sakowin Camp near the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation on November 30, 2016 outside Cannon Ball, North Dakota. Native Americans and activists from around the country have been gathering at the camp for several months trying to halt the construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline. The proposed 1,172 mile long pipeline would transport oil from the North Dakota Bakken region through South Dakota, Iowa and into Illinois. (Photo by Scott Olson/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:29
Officials: Pipeline will be re-routed
exp Amy Goodman on standing rock_00011414.jpg
exp Amy Goodman on standing rock_00011414.jpg
Now playing
04:39
Amy Goodman describes covering Standing Rock
Now playing
01:26
Pipeline protesters vow to remain
Now playing
02:58
Pipeline protesters defy evacuation order
Now playing
02:16
Protester: 'It will be a battle'
Police unleashed a water cannon on people protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota.
Kit Karzen
Police unleashed a water cannon on people protesting the Dakota Access Pipeline in North Dakota.
Now playing
03:00
Protesters fighting pipeline are staying put
Now playing
00:33
Meet Mni Wiconi, or Water is Life

Story highlights

Demonstrators chant and unveil a giant banner

"This issue is a tipping point issue for all of us," one says

New York CNN —  

Dozens of demonstrators aiming to raise awareness of the ongoing pipeline protest in North Dakota disrupted the morning commute at New York’s Grand Central Terminal on Tuesday before marching on the offices of major US banks to question their decision to fund the pipeline.

The protesters, who oppose the Dakota Access Pipeline, gathered in the station’s lobby floor at 8 a.m. to express solidarity with the demonstrations at Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota, they said. They then marched from Grand Central to the offices of Bank of America and JP Morgan to protest the big banks’ funding of the project.

Some chanted, “It is always a political fight.” Others waved signs that read, “Water is life” and, “Respect the Earth.” One large banner read, “Indigenous sovereignty protects the land and water.”

Lorena Ambrosio, a demonstrator originally from Peru, said she came to spread the word about protecting indigenous people. “Our people at Standing Rock are being terrorized by military and police,” she said. “They are being pepper sprayed, shot with rubber bullets, arrested and beaten. We will not stand for this.”

Lori Dalvi, from South Orange, New Jersey, said she has been participating in the protests since earlier this summer, raising awareness about the protests through Facebook and Twitter. “This issue is a tipping point issue for all of us,” she said. “If we do not change the way we are treating this Earth to receive our fuel and energy sources, we are in deep trouble.”

Protesters have been gathered in Standing Rock, North Dakota, since the Sioux tribe filed for a temporary restraining order in early September “to prevent further destruction of the tribe’s sacred sites by Dakota Access Pipeline.”

The 1,172-mile proposed pipeline would stretch across four states – North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa and Illinois. The project would cost $3.7 billion and aims to make the country more self-sufficient, but could prove to be an environmental disaster that destroys Native American sites, should it ever malfunction. The pipeline would carry 470,000 barrels of crude oil a day en route from North Dakota to Illinois.