"I Voted" stickers are shown on a polling place table November 2, 2010 at St. Luke's Lutheran Church in Reno, Nevada.
Getty Images
"I Voted" stickers are shown on a polling place table November 2, 2010 at St. Luke's Lutheran Church in Reno, Nevada.
Now playing
02:09
Can early voting lead to buyer's remorse?
Brooke Baldwin last show goodbye CNN newsroom vpx_00000217.png
CNN
Brooke Baldwin last show goodbye CNN newsroom vpx_00000217.png
Now playing
03:56
'Get a little uncomfortable': See Brooke Baldwin's last words on air
CNN
Now playing
02:56
Watch Anderson Cooper belly laugh with Cheri Oteri
Now playing
01:24
How Kyra Sedgwick got the cops called on Tom Cruise
Now playing
05:18
Anderson Cooper explains how he overcomes being shy
US Navy
Now playing
01:28
Pentagon confirms UFO video is real, taken by Navy pilot
Now playing
02:35
WWII veteran: End of the war was 'the biggest thrill of my life'
Fancy Feast/Purina
Now playing
01:06
Cat food company makes a cookbook ... for humans
Google Earth's new timelapse feature
Google
Google Earth's new timelapse feature
Now playing
01:09
Google Earth's new Timelapse feature shows 40 years of climate change in just seconds
Twitter | @brady9dream
Now playing
02:10
Pet owners pitch their pups to be dog brew's 'Chief Tasting Officer'
FOX/"The Masked Singer"
Now playing
01:23
'The Masked Singer' reveals identity of The Orca
LONDON, ENGLAND - DECEMBER 07:  A visual representation of the digital Cryptocurrency, Bitcoin on December 07, 2017 in London, England. Cryptocurrencies including Bitcoin, Ethereum, and Lightcoin have seen unprecedented growth in 2017, despite remaining extremely volatile. While digital currencies across the board have divided opinion between financial institutions, and now have a market cap of around 175 Billion USD, the crypto sector coninues to grow, as it continues to see wider mainstreem adoption. The price of one Bitcoin passed 15,000 USD across many exchanges today taking it higher than previous all time highs.  (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
Dan Kitwood/Getty Images
LONDON, ENGLAND - DECEMBER 07: A visual representation of the digital Cryptocurrency, Bitcoin on December 07, 2017 in London, England. Cryptocurrencies including Bitcoin, Ethereum, and Lightcoin have seen unprecedented growth in 2017, despite remaining extremely volatile. While digital currencies across the board have divided opinion between financial institutions, and now have a market cap of around 175 Billion USD, the crypto sector coninues to grow, as it continues to see wider mainstreem adoption. The price of one Bitcoin passed 15,000 USD across many exchanges today taking it higher than previous all time highs. (Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images)
Now playing
03:07
Bitcoin has an energy problem
The new all-electric Mercedes-EQS
Mercedes-Benz AG
The new all-electric Mercedes-EQS
Now playing
01:05
See the new all-electric EQS luxury sedan from Mercedes
Now playing
01:32
Scientists turned spiderwebs into music and it sounds like a nightmare
Jeopardy Productions, Inc.
Now playing
01:02
Aaron Rodgers' Green Bay Packers question stumps 'Jeopardy!' contestants
Now playing
05:18
Coinbase CFO: We're an on-ramp to the crypto economy

Story highlights

State officials in at least 7 states confirmed voters can change their ballots

The issue is getting notice because the record number of early voters this year

(CNN) —  

In some states, you really can vote twice … or even three times … and it’s legal.

But it will only count once.

While the process is little known and rarely used, some states do allow voters to change their early or absentee ballots with no questions asked.

The issue has received new attention because of the expected record number of early votes that will be cast in the 2016 presidential election. Some estimates are that up to 40% of voters will have cast their ballots before the polls open Tuesday, November 8.

In most of the states, voters who have already cast ballots need to show up to the polls on Election Day, have their prior vote nullified, and revote in-person to have their new vote – and only the new vote – counted.

If you live in Wisconsin, you can change your mind up to three times before your official ballot is cast and counted.

“We would let the individual, the voter, vote again and document that this was their second ballot issued. We’d keep a record of that, so they would only have up to three opportunities,” Oshkosh City Clerk Pam Ubrig told WBAY.

But that doesn’t mean many people actually take advantage of the rules. The Oshkosh City Clerk’s office told CNN on Monday that no one has actually tried to use their three chances yet.

Among the states that do allow voters to change their early ballot after it’s been cast are: Wisconsin; Minnesota; Michigan; Pennsylvania; New York; Connecticut; and Mississippi.

While the procedures differ among states, most election-related websites run by the states do not make the rules for changing an early or absentee ballot easy to find.

In some battleground districts, fickle voters are out of luck. Voting more than once is prohibited in Florida, North Carolina, Ohio, and Arizona, among others, election officials in those states told CNN.