The tumultuous 2016 campaign is in a sudden limbo

Updated 2:08 PM EDT, Mon October 24, 2016
Vucci/AP/Raedle/Getty Images
Now playing
02:31
Clinton and Trump enter final stretch of campaign
TV3
Now playing
01:01
Clinton: Children treated as political pawns
AUSTIN, TX - NOVEMBER 17:  Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton signs copies of her new book 'What Happened' at BookPeople on November 17, 2017 in Austin, Texas.  (Photo by Rick Kern/WireImage)
Rick Kern/WireImage/WireImage
AUSTIN, TX - NOVEMBER 17: Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton signs copies of her new book 'What Happened' at BookPeople on November 17, 2017 in Austin, Texas. (Photo by Rick Kern/WireImage)
Now playing
01:01
Hillary Clinton: That is an outright lie
Bill Clinton CBS Sunay Morning
cbs
Bill Clinton CBS Sunay Morning
Now playing
01:32
Bill Clinton reflects on Trump media coverage
President Donald Trump speaks at a rally at the Gaylord Opryland Resort and Convention Center, Tuesday, May 29, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Andrew Harnik/AP
President Donald Trump speaks at a rally at the Gaylord Opryland Resort and Convention Center, Tuesday, May 29, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Now playing
01:06
Trump: I drew in bigger crowds than Jay-Z
Getty Images
Now playing
01:34
Chelsea Clinton slams Ivanka over Trump support
CNNI
Now playing
01:39
Hillary Clinton trolls Trump with Russian hat
AUSTIN, TX - NOVEMBER 17:  Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton signs copies of her new book 'What Happened' at BookPeople on November 17, 2017 in Austin, Texas.  (Photo by Rick Kern/WireImage)
Rick Kern/WireImage/WireImage
AUSTIN, TX - NOVEMBER 17: Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton signs copies of her new book 'What Happened' at BookPeople on November 17, 2017 in Austin, Texas. (Photo by Rick Kern/WireImage)
Now playing
01:29
Clinton: Trump parrots what Putin says
US Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton makes a concession speech after being defeated by Republican President-elect Donald Trump, as former President Bill Clinton looks on in New York on November 9, 2016. / AFP / JEWEL SAMAD        (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images
US Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton makes a concession speech after being defeated by Republican President-elect Donald Trump, as former President Bill Clinton looks on in New York on November 9, 2016. / AFP / JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:01
Clinton: What went right, wrong in 2016
ST LOUIS, MO - OCTOBER 09:  Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (R) speaks as Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump looks on during the town hall debate at Washington University on October 9, 2016 in St Louis, Missouri. This is the second of three presidential debates scheduled prior to the November 8th election.  (Photo by Rick Wilking-Pool/Getty Images)
Pool/Getty Images
ST LOUIS, MO - OCTOBER 09: Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (R) speaks as Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump looks on during the town hall debate at Washington University on October 9, 2016 in St Louis, Missouri. This is the second of three presidential debates scheduled prior to the November 8th election. (Photo by Rick Wilking-Pool/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:07
Clinton: I was thinking 'back up, you creep'
Podesta talks Trump and Clinton_00055625.jpg
Podesta talks Trump and Clinton_00055625.jpg
Now playing
07:09
Podesta: Clinton is under Trump's skin
Comedy Central
Now playing
01:05
Trevor Noah on the benefit of Trump's tweets
Drew Angerer/Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Now playing
02:59
Clinton and Trump aides clash
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks before introducing his newly selected vice presidential running mate Mike Pence, governor of Indiana, during an event at the Hilton Midtown Hotel, July 16, 2016 in New York City.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks before introducing his newly selected vice presidential running mate Mike Pence, governor of Indiana, during an event at the Hilton Midtown Hotel, July 16, 2016 in New York City.
Now playing
02:52
Push back on Trump's voter fraud allegations
MANCHESTER, NH - APRIL 12: Donald Trump speaks at the Freedom Summit at The Executive Court Banquet Facility April 12, 2014 in Manchester, New Hampshire. The Freedom Summit held its inaugural event where national conservative leaders bring together grassroots activists on the eve of tax day. Photo by Darren McCollester/Getty Images)
Darren McCollester/Getty Images/FILE
MANCHESTER, NH - APRIL 12: Donald Trump speaks at the Freedom Summit at The Executive Court Banquet Facility April 12, 2014 in Manchester, New Hampshire. The Freedom Summit held its inaugural event where national conservative leaders bring together grassroots activists on the eve of tax day. Photo by Darren McCollester/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:38
Trump tweets slam Clinton over recount
US Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (R) and US Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump shake hands at the end of the second presidential debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, on October 9, 2016. / AFP / Robyn Beck        (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images
US Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (R) and US Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump shake hands at the end of the second presidential debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, on October 9, 2016. / AFP / Robyn Beck (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
06:14
Duffy: I'm with Trump - don't go after Clinton

Story highlights

Trump insists he can still win

Much of the focus shifting to Capitol Hill

Washington CNN —  

The most dramatic and unpredictable presidential election in decades is suddenly slipping into a strange state of suspended animation.

Donald Trump and his team, facing widening deficits in the polls, insist the Republican nominee can still win. But he and his allies seem to be increasingly contemplating the possibility of defeat.

Hillary Clinton, meanwhile, is sizing up the challenges of a possible presidency at a time of deep polarization even as her aides say she’s taking nothing for granted.

Clinton looking past Trump to transition planning

With just over two weeks remaining before Election Day, much of the drama is shifting to Capitol Hill, where anxious Republican leaders – estranged from their nominee – can do little more than fret about how bad it could get. Trump’s stumbling campaign threatens to wipe out the GOP’s majority in the Senate – and maybe even the House.

Clinton will aim to build pressure on congressional Republicans Monday when she joins Sen. Elizabeth Warren in New Hampshire to slam GOP lawmakers for standing by Trump. Her clear target: Kelly Ayotte, one of the Senate’s most vulnerable Republicans who has struggled to grapple with Trump’s candidacy.

Trump has been counted out before, so it’s still too early to write him off. And voters – not polls and pundits – decide elections. But unless there is an abrupt Trump revival, another October surprise that could once again upend the race or a cataclysmic miss by the majority of pollsters, the Republican nominee seems to be on a glide path to defeat on November 8.

Too far behind

A new ABC News national poll released Sunday had Clinton 12 points up on Trump, clinching the support of 50% of likely voters nationwide. CNN’s Poll of Polls gives the Democratic nominee a nine-point edge. The mounting evidence seems to be fueling a realization in the Trump camp that he may be too far behind to catch up — with hundreds of thousands of ballots already cast in some early voting states.

Several times in recent days, the billionaire has appeared to be laying the groundwork for a defeat — whether with his claims of a rigged election that could be a face-saver if he loses — or in wistful musings about the days ahead.

“I don’t want to think back, if only I had done one more North Carolina rally maybe I would have won by 500 votes instead of losing it by 200 votes,” Trump said Friday, while adding a caveat that he still thinks he will win.

“I never want to look back,” he said. “I never want to say that about myself.”

Trump occasionally seemed tired on the stump over the weekend — though sometimes took heart from his large crowds. He was also less prone to depart his teleprompter for ad libs that land him in trouble.

In Newtown, Pennsylvania, on Friday night, the Republican nominee appeared to admit his campaign needed a significant boost.

“I’ve wasted time, energy, and money — so you’ve got to get out,” he said. “We got to turn this thing around.”

And last Tuesday, Trump, a connoisseur of polls, said he had even lost faith in the few surveys that have him ahead.

“Now even though we’re doing pretty good in the polls, I don’t believe in the polls anymore,” he said.

Trump’s campaign manager Kellyanne Conway admitted the campaign’s struggling position Sunday, but was loathe to give Clinton any credit for her lead.

’We are behind’

We are behind,” Conway said on NBC’s “Meet the Press.”

“She has tremendous advantages,” Conway said of Clinton. “She has a former president, happens to be her husband, campaigning for her, the current president and first lady, vice president, all much more popular than she can hope to be.”

But if Trump is going down, he will do it his way.

He’s showing that he will continue to lash out, is happy to settle scores with GOP critics like House Speaker Paul Ryan while he still can, and will use the media spotlight to wage his own personal battles before the American people.

On Sunday night, the GOP nominee, who has spent months laying into the establishment, pleaded with his supports to keep the House and Senate in Republican hands even as he groused that he would like the party to do more to boost his campaign.

“Go out and vote and that includes helping me reelect Republicans all over the place,” Trump said in Naples, Florida. “I hope they help me too! It’d be nice if they help us too, right?”

But a day earlier, in the symbolic surroundings of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, he made clear that the campaign that was all about him from the start will end with him in the spotlight – even if it’s not in his best political interest. The event was billed as a chance for Trump to lay out a Contract With America-style agenda for his first 100 days as president in surroundings that resonate with a desire for national unity and reconciliation.

But Trump characteristically stole his own headlines, threatening to sue women who accused him of sexual assault after the election and lambasting the media for rigging the race against him.

Latest Trump accuser says he hugged, kissed her without permission

Once again, he detracted from the meat of his message, which included detailed proposals on new ethics reforms and labeling China a currency manipulator along with plans to spark economic and jobs growth and a tough strategy to crush ISIS.

Speaking with Jake Tapper Sunday on CNN’s “State of the Union,” Conway declined to say if she knew that her boss would weave such a personally focused tirade into his Gettysburg speech.

’This is his candidacy’

“He delivers his own speeches,” she said. “This is his candidacy. He’s the guy who is running for the White House. And he has the privilege to say what he wants.”

But Jane Hall, a professor of communications at American University, told CNN’s “Reliable Sources” Sunday that Trump was being himself and displaying the indiscipline that has hurt his campaign.

“He wasn’t off message,” she said. “That is his message.”

Increasingly, Trump supporters are forced to cherry pick polls that show their candidate competitive, or to place their faith in crowd sizes and enthusiasm on the trail, metrics that often seem attractive to lagging campaigns.

Trump’s son Eric, for instance, said Sunday on ABC’s “This Week” that he doesn’t put much “credence” in the ABC poll, denying he was in a “bubble” where Trump’s support seems broader than it is.

“He had 10,000 people in Cleveland,” Trump said. “You know, Hillary and – and Tim Kaine, they were in Pennsylvania. They had 600 p