The footprint of a carnivorous theropod uncovered on a Western Australian beach.
Bindi Lee Porth
The footprint of a carnivorous theropod uncovered on a Western Australian beach.
Now playing
00:45
Dinosaur prints found on beach
Fox News/Twitter
Now playing
01:33
ADL wants Fox News to fire Tucker Carlson over racist comments
CNN
Now playing
02:36
The truth behind Covid-19 vaccines for sale on the dark web
Now playing
04:22
Levi's CEO has message for Mitch McConnell
Now playing
01:54
'You think I'm racist': Former Fox News host storms off camera
Korie Robertson and Willie Robertson of the reality series "Duck Dynasty" attend the Capitol File 58th Presidential Inauguration Reception at Fiola Mare on January 19, 2017 in Washington, DC.
Paul Morigi/Getty Images
Korie Robertson and Willie Robertson of the reality series "Duck Dynasty" attend the Capitol File 58th Presidential Inauguration Reception at Fiola Mare on January 19, 2017 in Washington, DC.
Now playing
01:46
'Duck Dynasty' stars discuss raising biracial son on new show
FOX/"The Masked Singer"
Now playing
01:24
Nick Cannon makes big splash in 'Masked Singer' return
The Drew Barrymore Show/YouTube
Now playing
01:26
'Mom' star speaks out about not having kids in real life
Heinz ketchup packets are shown in New York on Monday, August 22, 2005. H.J. Heinz Co., the world's biggest ketchup maker, said first-quarter profit fell 19 percent on expenses to cut jobs and sell businesses.  (Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty Images
Heinz ketchup packets are shown in New York on Monday, August 22, 2005. H.J. Heinz Co., the world's biggest ketchup maker, said first-quarter profit fell 19 percent on expenses to cut jobs and sell businesses. (Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
Now playing
01:53
Restaurants face a nationwide ketchup packet shortage
Camerota Berman both
CNN
Camerota Berman both
Now playing
02:33
CNN anchor Alisyn Camerota gets surprise tribute from co-anchor
Citigroup Chairman Richard Parsons delivers remarks on the US economy at the New York State Bar Association meetings in New York, January 28, 2009. Troubled US banking giant Citigroup last week named Parsons as its new chairman, the longtime top executive at media giant Time Warner, to steer it through its most challenging period.  AFP PHOTO / Emmanuel Dunand (Photo credit should read EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP via Getty Images)
EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
Citigroup Chairman Richard Parsons delivers remarks on the US economy at the New York State Bar Association meetings in New York, January 28, 2009. Troubled US banking giant Citigroup last week named Parsons as its new chairman, the longtime top executive at media giant Time Warner, to steer it through its most challenging period. AFP PHOTO / Emmanuel Dunand (Photo credit should read EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
02:47
Dick Parsons: Georgia law is a bald-faced attempt to suppress Black vote
Courtesy of Warner Bros. Picture
Now playing
02:54
'Godzilla vs. Kong' is a pandemic box office hit
Now playing
01:30
5 ways to cut your plastic waste
CNN/Getty Images
Now playing
04:40
Stelter: After elevating Gaetz, Fox News barely covering scandal
NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona
Now playing
01:08
See NASA spacecraft successfully land on an asteroid
Now playing
06:51
Alisyn Camerota's kids wish her good luck in new role on CNN

Story highlights

Freshly uncovered footprints found on a busy Western Australian beach

Paleontologist says they may have come from four-meter long carnivore

(CNN) —  

Everyone knows you have to watch out for sharks on Australian beaches – but what about dinosaurs?

A 130-million year old dinosaur footprint has been found among the seaweed and surf on popular Cable Beach near the town of Broome, Western Australia.

Bindi Lee Porth told CNN she was collecting seashells when she felt an indent in the sand. Clearing it away, she found a number of massive, preserved footprints.

“I’ve been down there every night with tourists, kids, locals. I’ve been getting kids to stand in them and walk along the tracks of the dinosaurs,” she said.

“It’s unbelievable to stand in the tracks, close your eyes and put yourself back there in time. It’s very hard to describe, it’s just amazing.”

Porth said she had been on the beach dozens of times before without seeing any dinosaur footprints.

One of a number of footprints found along the beach.
Bindi Lee Porth
One of a number of footprints found along the beach.

University of Queensland palaeontologist Steve Salisbury told CNN the tracks had probably been covered by sand or water for decades, but erratic tides at Cable Beach had finally revealed them.

He said the tracks were called Megalosauropus Broomensis and they were probably made by a medium-sized carnivore.

“It was a type of theropod dinosaur, a carnivorous one,” he said. “The tracks are about 30 to 50 centimeters (1 to 1.6 feet) long so we can tell the dinosaur was probably about 1.5 meters (5 feet) high at the hips and maybe 2.5 to 4 meters (8 to 13 feet) long.”

A series of dinosaur footprints uncovered on a Western Australian beach.
Bindi Lee Porth
A series of dinosaur footprints uncovered on a Western Australian beach.

Dinosaur tracks have been part of Aboriginal mythology, known as Dreamtime, in the area for generations.

Dinosaur or Emu Man?

“This particular spot, for instance, is known to have tracks on it and is called the Place of the Emu Man,” Salisbury said, referring to the three-toed tracks similar to emu footprints.

Other footprints found include those of the stegosaurus and the enormous, herbivorous brontosaurus.

According to Salisbury, the rock which holds the footprints is stronger than the layers above it, which have washed away over the years to expose the footprints to the air once again.

“As it weathers away we start to see these ancient surfaces emerge. What you’re essentially seeing are surfaces that are frozen in time and were walked over by dinosaurs millions of years ago,” he said.

“It’s quite spectacular.”