A longer commute could hurt your health, add to your waistline

Story highlights

  • A new report has found that commuters in the UK consume an extra 800 calories each week
  • Long commutes are associated with stress, increased BMI, poor sleep and reduced sociability

(CNN)If someone told you their journey to work took them one hour, how would you react?

Would you envy the brevity of their commute, nod in agreement with mutual respect, or retract in horror at the thought of losing so much of the day?
The majority of commuters living in England and Wales would nod in agreement as the two countries face some of the longest commutes globally, according to a new report (PDF) by the Royal Society of Public Health.
    The average commute time across both countries reached 56 minutes in 2013, with the majority of people spending this time on trains and buses, or inside cars. But, more importantly, spending these extended periods of time in transit can be harmful to your health.
    According to the report, average commuters in the UK feel they add almost 800 calories to their weekly diet because of what they consume during and because of the commute.
    "There is a noticeable decline in health and well being if you have a longer commute," said Emma Lloyd, policy and research manager at the RSPH, who wrote the report.
    "Commuting is a highly stressful experience," she said, adding that poor health is further fueled by factors such as reduced physical activity leading to increased BMI and blood pressure, and less time for healthy eating, physical activity, being sociable and sleeping.
    Londoners faced the longest commute, averaging 79 minutes to reach their workplace, putting them ahead of all US cities, including Los Angeles, Chicago and New York.
    The RSPH warn that issues such as cost and convenience have been prioritized when it comes to commuting culture, while public health aspects have been neglected. "We mustn't forget the health and wellbeing angle," said Lloyd.
    Commute times were based on data from the Office for National Statistics, but an additional poll of 1,500 commuters by the RSPH identified some of the reasons why commuters are becoming less healthy. More than half of people feel more stressed as a result of their commute, while 44% said they spent less time with family and friends, and 41% reported doing less physical activity. Approximately one-third reported sleeping less, as well as snacking more and eating more junk food.
    It's now time for some change, researchers said.
    "There is an appetite for it," said Lloyd. "The public are frustrated, too, and want a less stressful commute."

    What can change?

    The RSPH report includes a range of recommendations to help solve the problem and create a happier, healthier culture for commuters in England and Wales. These include employers embracing the connectivity available today to enable staff to move away from the rigid 9-to-5 working day and have more flexible working hours to reduce overcrowding at peak times of travel.
    Almost three in five (58%) people who were polled felt that flexible working hours would improve their health and wellbeing.
    Other recommendations include providin