NEW YORK - JULY 10:  A man wipes sweat from his face July 10, 2007 in New York City. New York City is experiencing a second day of a heat wave with temperatures in the upper 90`s and uncomfortable humidity levels.  (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Spencer Platt/Getty Images North America/Getty Images
NEW YORK - JULY 10: A man wipes sweat from his face July 10, 2007 in New York City. New York City is experiencing a second day of a heat wave with temperatures in the upper 90`s and uncomfortable humidity levels. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:07
Nighttime 'lows' more dangerous than highs
The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on NOAA-20 acquired this image of Hurricane Laura at 2:20 a.m. Central Daylight Time on August 26, 2020.
NASA Earth Observatory/Joshua Stevens
The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) on NOAA-20 acquired this image of Hurricane Laura at 2:20 a.m. Central Daylight Time on August 26, 2020.
Now playing
01:13
Another active hurricane season is forecasted with 17 named storms
This picture taken on July 26, 2015 shows a child playing in a fountain on a square to cool himself amid a heatwave in Binzhou, eastern China's Shandong province.   CHINA OUT     AFP PHOTO        (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
STR/AFP/AFP/Getty Images
This picture taken on July 26, 2015 shows a child playing in a fountain on a square to cool himself amid a heatwave in Binzhou, eastern China's Shandong province. CHINA OUT AFP PHOTO (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:14
What NOT to do in a heat wave
Larry Pierson, from the Isle of Palms, S.C., purchases bottled water from the Harris Teeter grocery store on the Isle of Palms in preparation for Hurricane Florence at the Isle of Palms S.C., Monday, Sept. 10, 2018. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
Mic Smith/AP
Larry Pierson, from the Isle of Palms, S.C., purchases bottled water from the Harris Teeter grocery store on the Isle of Palms in preparation for Hurricane Florence at the Isle of Palms S.C., Monday, Sept. 10, 2018. (AP Photo/Mic Smith)
Now playing
00:57
How to prepare for a hurricane
how hail is formed explainer orig_00000021.jpg
how hail is formed explainer orig_00000021.jpg
Now playing
01:00
How hail is formed
IN SPACE - In this handout photo provided by NASA, Hurricane Patricia is seen from the International Space Station. The hurricane made landfall on the Pacfic coast of Mexico on October 23. (Photo by Scott Kelly/NASA via Getty Images)
NASA
IN SPACE - In this handout photo provided by NASA, Hurricane Patricia is seen from the International Space Station. The hurricane made landfall on the Pacfic coast of Mexico on October 23. (Photo by Scott Kelly/NASA via Getty Images)
Now playing
01:07
Why hurricanes are so hard to predict
Storm chasing photographers take photos underneath a rotating supercell storm system in Maxwell, Nebraska on September 3, 2016. Although multiple tornado warnings were issued throughout the area, no funnel cloud touched down. / AFP / Josh Edelson / XGTY
RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE  / MANDATORY CREDIT:  "AFP PHOTO / Josh EDELSON" / NO MARKETING / NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS /  DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS  ==        (Photo credit should read JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)
JOSH EDELSON/AFP/AFP/Getty Images
Storm chasing photographers take photos underneath a rotating supercell storm system in Maxwell, Nebraska on September 3, 2016. Although multiple tornado warnings were issued throughout the area, no funnel cloud touched down. / AFP / Josh Edelson / XGTY RESTRICTED TO EDITORIAL USE / MANDATORY CREDIT: "AFP PHOTO / Josh EDELSON" / NO MARKETING / NO ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS / DISTRIBUTED AS A SERVICE TO CLIENTS == (Photo credit should read JOSH EDELSON/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
00:59
The difference between a tornado watch and a warning
Now playing
01:26
Hurricanes: What you don't know
Courtesy Amy Lloyd
Now playing
01:06
Why flash floods are so dangerous
Now playing
01:54
Why snow and blackouts in Texas are a preview for all of us
ring of fire chad myers weather orig_00003221.jpg
ring of fire chad myers weather orig_00003221.jpg
Now playing
01:13
What is the 'Ring of Fire'?
TOPSHOT - A city worker drives through the flooded street during Hurricane Sally in downtown Pensacola, Florida on September 16, 2020. - Hurricane Sally barrelled into the US Gulf Coast early Wednesday, with forecasts of drenching rains that could provoke "historic" and potentially deadly flash floods.The National Hurricane Center (NHC) said the Category 2 storm hit Gulf Shores, Alabama at about 4:45 am (0945 GMT), bringing maximum sustained winds of about 105 miles (165 kilometers) per hour."Historic life-threatening flooding likely along portions of the northern Gulf coast," the Miami-based center had warned late Tuesday, adding the hurricane could dump up to 20 inches (50 centimeters) of rain in some areas. (Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA / AFP) (Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images)
CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
TOPSHOT - A city worker drives through the flooded street during Hurricane Sally in downtown Pensacola, Florida on September 16, 2020. - Hurricane Sally barrelled into the US Gulf Coast early Wednesday, with forecasts of drenching rains that could provoke "historic" and potentially deadly flash floods.The National Hurricane Center (NHC) said the Category 2 storm hit Gulf Shores, Alabama at about 4:45 am (0945 GMT), bringing maximum sustained winds of about 105 miles (165 kilometers) per hour."Historic life-threatening flooding likely along portions of the northern Gulf coast," the Miami-based center had warned late Tuesday, adding the hurricane could dump up to 20 inches (50 centimeters) of rain in some areas. (Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA / AFP) (Photo by CHANDAN KHANNA/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
01:41
How to prepare for severe weather
Franck Verdière/Twitter
Now playing
01:10
What 'rapid intensification' means for storms
natural disasters climate change project planet weir orig_00000313.jpg
CNN
natural disasters climate change project planet weir orig_00000313.jpg
Now playing
03:42
The future of climate change is here, scientist warns
Now playing
01:29
Steer like this to stay out of accidents in the snow
how hurricanes are named orig_00002729.jpg
how hurricanes are named orig_00002729.jpg
Now playing
01:38
How are hurricanes named?

Story highlights

Temperatures close to 100 degrees are expected across dozens of states

Five elderly Michigan residents died due to record heat and humidity

CNN —  

Dangerously high temperatures will keep scorching the Northeast in the wake of a deadly wave of heat and humidity that has plagued the Midwest.

Heat indexes well over 100 degrees are expected across dozens of states in the nation’s central and eastern portions, the National Weather Service forecasts. A heat index combines the effects of temperature and humidity on the human body.

Temperatures also could reach the century mark Monday afternoon in New York, Philadelphia and Washington.

Nearly 114 million people are under excessive heat watches, warnings and advisories in effect across 27 states on Sunday, CNN meteorologist Sean Morris said.

The sweltering Midwest weather claimed the lives of a handful of people in the Detroit area over the course of three days, Roseville Police Chief James Berlin told CNN.

Five elderly residents who had underlying health issues died as a result of the soaring temperatures, Berlin said. Residents were encouraged to stay hydrated and find an air-conditioned place to avoid heat exhaustion or heat stroke.

Police and firefighters in the Detroit suburb of Roseville are doing their part to help residents beat the summer heat. They are offering rides to cooling centers set up at the city’s recreation center and public library and distributing water to residents.

Heat is one of the country’s leading weather-related killers, and each year dozens of Americans die from overexposure to high temperatures, according to The National Weather Service.

Heat stroke can happen very quickly after heat exhaustion settles in.
Heat stroke can happen very quickly after heat exhaustion settles in.

Hot, dry and breezy conditions across the West Coast have also hampered efforts to contain the rapidly expanding Sand Fire. The fast-growing wildfire, which was only 18% contained Sunday, has consumed more than 22,000 acres.

Warmest half-year on record

Scientists note the record temperatures across the country could be part of a long-term global warming phenomenon. Last week NASA announced that every month in 2016 has been the hottest ever recorded.

Follow CNN Health on Facebook and Twitter

  • See the latest news and share your comments with CNN Health on Facebook and Twitter.

Global temperatures were on average 1.3 degrees Celsius (2.4 degrees Fahrenheit) higher than average between January and June this year when compared to the late 19th century, NOAA said.

CNN’s Sean Morris, Doug Criss and Keith Allen contributed to this report.