WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 17: President Obama speaks at a press conference in the Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House on July 17, 2016 in Washington, DC. Obama remarked on the shooting in Baton Rouge, Louisiana in which three officers were killed and three more wounded by armed suspects. (Photo by Leigh Vogel/Getty Images)

Presumptive US Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump addreses a campaign rally at Grant Park Event Center in Westfield, Indiana. / AFP / Tasos KATOPODIS (Photo credit should read TASOS KATOPODIS/AFP/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - JULY 17: President Obama speaks at a press conference in the Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House on July 17, 2016 in Washington, DC. Obama remarked on the shooting in Baton Rouge, Louisiana in which three officers were killed and three more wounded by armed suspects. (Photo by Leigh Vogel/Getty Images) Presumptive US Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump addreses a campaign rally at Grant Park Event Center in Westfield, Indiana. / AFP / Tasos KATOPODIS (Photo credit should read TASOS KATOPODIS/AFP/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Getty Images
Now playing
02:40
Obama pushes back against Donald Trump's speech
Donald Trump Obama depart US Capitol vo_00001902.jpg
Donald Trump Obama depart US Capitol vo_00001902.jpg
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
01:46
Trump, Obama depart inaugural ceremony
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
00:45
Inaugural crowd sizes: Trump v. Obama
US President Barack Obama speaks during his farewell address in Chicago, Illinois on January 10, 2017.
Barack Obama closes the book on his presidency, with a farewell speech in Chicago that will try to lift supporters shaken by Donald Trump
US President Barack Obama speaks during his farewell address in Chicago, Illinois on January 10, 2017. Barack Obama closes the book on his presidency, with a farewell speech in Chicago that will try to lift supporters shaken by Donald Trump's shock election. / AFP / Joshua LOTT (Photo credit should read JOSHUA LOTT/AFP/Getty Images)
PHOTO: JOSHUA LOTT/AFP/Getty Images
Now playing
03:02
President Obama's best speech moments
PHOTO: pool
Now playing
02:00
President Obama leaves Oval Office
US President Barack Obama, speaks about Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump during a news conference with Singapore
US President Barack Obama, speaks about Republican Presidential candidate Donald Trump during a news conference with Singapore's Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong, in the East Room at the White House August 2, 2016 in Washington, DC. Later this evening President Obama will host a State Dinner for Prime Minister Loong and his wife Ho Ching.
PHOTO: Mark Wilson/Getty Images
Now playing
01:09
Obama commutes federal sentences
PHOTO: White House Pool report
Now playing
00:45
How the Obamas spent MLK Day
Joe Biden Medal of Freedom
Joe Biden Medal of Freedom
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
01:48
Biden receives Presidential Medal of Freedom
Now playing
01:09
Obama: You made me a better president
Obama tears up
Obama tears up
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
02:00
Obama tears up talking about Michelle
President Obama in Chicago, January. 10, 2017.
President Obama in Chicago, January. 10, 2017.
Now playing
01:27
Obama lists US accomplishments during his term
obama laughs at his own jokes sg orig_00004321.jpg
obama laughs at his own jokes sg orig_00004321.jpg
Now playing
01:06
Watch Obama crack himself up
PHOTO: CNN
Now playing
02:37
2 Obama speeches: 12 years apart, similar tone
fort lauderdale airport shooting obama sot tsr_00005621.jpg
fort lauderdale airport shooting obama sot tsr_00005621.jpg
PHOTO: ABC
Now playing
01:16
Obama: 'Vladimir Putin is not on our team'
PHOTO: cnn/getty images
Now playing
03:00
Obama urges Dems to defend Obamacare legacy
President Barack Obama speaks on counterterrorism at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, Florida on December 6, 2016.
President Barack Obama speaks on counterterrorism at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, Florida on December 6, 2016.
PHOTO: MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images
Now playing
02:35
Obama takes action before Trump takes office
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 16:  U.S. President Barack Obama answers questions during a news conference in the Brady Press Breifing Room at the White House December 16, 2016 in Washington, DC. In what could be the last press conference of his presidency, afterwards Obama will be leaving for his annual family vacation in Hawaii.  (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 16: U.S. President Barack Obama answers questions during a news conference in the Brady Press Breifing Room at the White House December 16, 2016 in Washington, DC. In what could be the last press conference of his presidency, afterwards Obama will be leaving for his annual family vacation in Hawaii. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
PHOTO: Mark Wilson/Getty Images
Now playing
01:07
Obama designates two new national monuments
PHOTO: Amanda Lucidon/The White House
Now playing
00:48
The Obamas' cutest moments (2016)
(CNN) —  

The deeply pessimistic outlook that Donald Trump offered at this week’s Republican National Convention doesn’t match reality, President Barack Obama insisted on Friday.

Noting he didn’t watch Trump’s prime-time acceptance speech on Thursday – “I’ve got a lot of stuff to do” – Obama said he read news coverage of the remarks. And he said they didn’t match most Americans’ experiences.

“This idea that America is somehow on the verge of collapse, this vision of violence and chaos everywhere, doesn’t really jibe with the experience of most people,” Obama said during a press conference in the White House East Room alongside Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto.

“I think it is important to be absolutely clear here. Some of the fears that were expressed throughout the week just don’t jibe with the facts,” he said, going on to cite statistics showing crime rates have fallen under his presidency.

“America is much less violent than it was 20 or 30 years ago,” Obama said.

“We’re not going to make good decisions based on fears that don’t have a basis in fact,” the President said. “And that, I think, is something that I hope all Americans pay attention to.”

However, less than three hours after the news conference, Obama addressed the public again to offer support to Germany after several mall-goers were reported dead and injured from a shooting spree in Munich.

Obama called Germany “one of our closest allies” and pledged “all of the support they may need.”

Obama was speaking the day after Trump formally accepted the Republican presidential nomination with a lengthy address at his party’s convention. The speech cast the country as woefully off-course after seven-and-a-half years under Obama’s leadership, painting a dark portrait of crime run amok, a lagging economy, and constant threats of terrorism.

Speaking later Friday to CBS News, Obama said the attack in Munich didn’t prove Trump was right about the emerging threat of terrorism.

“Terrorism is a real threat, and nobody knows that better than me,” Obama said on “Face the Nation,” according to excerpts released Friday afternoon. “One of the best ways of preventing it is making sure we don’t divide our own country, that we don’t succumb to fear, that we don’t sacrifice our values, and that we send a very strong signal to the world and to every American citizen that we’re in this together.”

Obama, who last month endorsed Hillary Clinton, his former secretary of state, is expected to spend this weekend preparing his own convention address, set to be delivered Wednesday evening in Philadelphia, where Democrats are gathering. It’s his first political speech since he campaigned with Clinton earlier this month in Charlotte, North Carolina.

In that speech, Obama appeared loathe to mention Trump by name, preferring instead to make implicit references to his policies and rhetoric. Obama has said that Trump has been successful enough in generating his own publicity without any presidential mentions.

But the decision to invite the president of Mexico – a country that has been a recurrent focus of the Republican’s campaign – for talks and a press conference after the GOP convention provided a high-profile opportunity for Obama to rebut Trump’s address, during which he cited his plan to build a wall along the Mexican border.

Making his pitch for a massive trade deal with Pacific nations, Obama pushed back against Trump’s more isolationist platform – and took a dig at the GOP candidate’s proposed border wall.

“Globalization is a fact, because of technology, because of an integrated global supply chain, because of changes in transportation,” he said. “And we’re not going to be able to build a wall around that.”

The US and Mexican presidents met in person only three weeks ago at a North American Leaders summit in Canada. It’s rare for Obama to meet with the same foreign counterpart in such a short time span.

Pena Nieto has been outspoken in his distaste for Trump, comparing the GOP nominee to fascist dictators Adolph Hitler and Benito Mussolini. He’s rejected Trump’s suggestion that Mexico should pay for a border wall.

But on Friday he instead stressed the “unbreakable” relationship between his country and the United States, no matter who becomes president.

“The closeness between the US and Mexico is more than a relationship between two governments,” Pena Nieto said through a translator in his opening remarks. “It is a solid, sound, unbreakable relationship between peoples who live in both nations.”

“I am certain the political process in the following months will be characterized by the intensity of the debate,” he said, offering his “deepest respect” to both Clinton and Trump.

In their Oval Office talks earlier Friday, Obama and Pena Nieto discussed trade and climate change.