senator tim scott stopped seven times police sot _00000000.jpg
senator tim scott stopped seven times police sot _00000000.jpg
Now playing
00:46
Black senator: I was stopped 7 times by police
Fox News/Twitter
Now playing
01:33
ADL wants Fox News to fire Tucker Carlson over racist comments
CNN
Now playing
02:36
The truth behind Covid-19 vaccines for sale on the dark web
Now playing
04:22
Levi's CEO has message for Mitch McConnell
Now playing
01:54
'You think I'm racist': Former Fox News host storms off camera
Korie Robertson and Willie Robertson of the reality series "Duck Dynasty" attend the Capitol File 58th Presidential Inauguration Reception at Fiola Mare on January 19, 2017 in Washington, DC.
Paul Morigi/Getty Images
Korie Robertson and Willie Robertson of the reality series "Duck Dynasty" attend the Capitol File 58th Presidential Inauguration Reception at Fiola Mare on January 19, 2017 in Washington, DC.
Now playing
01:46
'Duck Dynasty' stars discuss raising biracial son on new show
FOX/"The Masked Singer"
Now playing
01:24
Nick Cannon makes big splash in 'Masked Singer' return
The Drew Barrymore Show/YouTube
Now playing
01:26
'Mom' star speaks out about not having kids in real life
Heinz ketchup packets are shown in New York on Monday, August 22, 2005. H.J. Heinz Co., the world's biggest ketchup maker, said first-quarter profit fell 19 percent on expenses to cut jobs and sell businesses.  (Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg/Getty Images
Heinz ketchup packets are shown in New York on Monday, August 22, 2005. H.J. Heinz Co., the world's biggest ketchup maker, said first-quarter profit fell 19 percent on expenses to cut jobs and sell businesses. (Photo by Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images)
Now playing
01:53
Restaurants face a nationwide ketchup packet shortage
Camerota Berman both
CNN
Camerota Berman both
Now playing
02:33
CNN anchor Alisyn Camerota gets surprise tribute from co-anchor
Citigroup Chairman Richard Parsons delivers remarks on the US economy at the New York State Bar Association meetings in New York, January 28, 2009. Troubled US banking giant Citigroup last week named Parsons as its new chairman, the longtime top executive at media giant Time Warner, to steer it through its most challenging period.  AFP PHOTO / Emmanuel Dunand (Photo credit should read EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP via Getty Images)
EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP/AFP via Getty Images
Citigroup Chairman Richard Parsons delivers remarks on the US economy at the New York State Bar Association meetings in New York, January 28, 2009. Troubled US banking giant Citigroup last week named Parsons as its new chairman, the longtime top executive at media giant Time Warner, to steer it through its most challenging period. AFP PHOTO / Emmanuel Dunand (Photo credit should read EMMANUEL DUNAND/AFP via Getty Images)
Now playing
02:47
Dick Parsons: Georgia law is a bald-faced attempt to suppress Black vote
Courtesy of Warner Bros. Picture
Now playing
02:54
'Godzilla vs. Kong' is a pandemic box office hit
Now playing
01:30
5 ways to cut your plastic waste
CNN/Getty Images
Now playing
04:40
Stelter: After elevating Gaetz, Fox News barely covering scandal
NASA/Goddard/University of Arizona
Now playing
01:08
See NASA spacecraft successfully land on an asteroid
Now playing
06:51
Alisyn Camerota's kids wish her good luck in new role on CNN

Story highlights

Sen. Tim Scott says he has been pulled over by police repeatedly

The South Carolina Republican also voiced support for law enforcement

(CNN) —  

Sen. Tim Scott of South Carolina – who is the only African-American Republican in U.S. Senate – delivered an emotional floor speech Wednesday about the unfair police scrutiny he has faced over his life because he is a black man.

“In the course of one year, I’ve been stopped seven times by law enforcement,” Scott said. “Not four, not five, not six, but seven times in one year as an elected official.”

The speech was the second of three the conservative first-term senator is delivering this week related to the fatal shootings of two African-American men by white police officers and the sniper attack that killed five Dallas police officers by a black man angry over police mistreatment of African-Americans.

Scott described this speech as “the most difficult because it is the most personal.”

“In many cities and towns across America, there is a deep divide between the black community and law enforcement. A trust gap, a tension that has been growing for decades. And as a family, one American family, we cannot ignore these issues,” Scott said.

“I can certainly remember the very first time that I was pulled over by a police officer as just a youngster. I was driving a car that had an improper headlight,” Scott said. “The cop came over to my car, hand on his gun and said, ‘Boy, don’t you know your headlight is not working properly?’ I felt embarrassed, ashamed, and scared, very scared.”

Holding up two fingers, Scott said there were times when he was pulled over that he was speeding.

“But the vast majority of the time I was pulled over for nothing more than driving a new car in the wrong neighborhood or some other reason just as trivial,” he said.

Scott described drawing the attention of a police officer once as he drove out of a shopping mall. The cop pulled right behind Scott and followed him as he drove home, taking three left turns along the way.

“Finally, I took a fourth left coming into my apartment complex and then the blue lights went on. The officer approached the car and said that I did not – I did not use my turn signal on the fourth turn,” Scott said. “Do you really think that somehow I forgot to use my turn signal on the fourth turn?”

Another time Scott says he was pulled over by an officer who accused him of stealing the car he was driving. The senator recounted how his brother, who was a high-ranking enlisted man in the Army, was accused of the same thing when he was driving home one day in a Volvo.

Scott also described the plight of a former staffer who sold his “nice car” because he was so “tired of being targeted” by suspicious police.

“Imagine the frustration, the irritation, the sense of loss of dignity that accompanies each of those stops, even here on Capitol Hill,” Scott said.

Scott said he has even faced problems with U.S. Capitol Police as he has arrived at work. The officers are trained to recognize all lawmakers but Scott said he has faced “attitude” and forced to show his identification to get in. On three separate occasions, he has received calls of apology from a supervisor or the chief of the Capitol Police over the way he was treated, Scott said.

In his speech, Scott also praised police and the dangerous work they do.

“There is never, ever an acceptable reason to harm a member of our law enforcement community,” he said.

At the end of his speech, Scott pleaded with Americans who don’t face racism not to ignore the plight of those who do.

“Recognize that just because you do not feel the pain, the anguish of another, does not mean it does not exist. To ignore their struggles, our struggles, does not make them disappear. It simply leaves you blind and the American family very vulnerable,” he said.

“Some search so hard to explain away injustice that they are slowly wiping away who we are as a nation. But we must come together to fulfill what we all know is possible here in America: Peace, love, and understanding. Fairness,” Scott said.