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Next week is shaping up to inflict the most dramatic damage on television yet to Donald Trump's campaign

Clinton's campaign has reserved about $7.5 million in advertising time the week of July 4

Washington CNN  — 

Next week is shaping up to inflict the most dramatic damage on television yet to Donald Trump’s campaign, with forces behind Hillary Clinton planning to outspend him by $13 million, a wider gap than any week so far.

Clinton’s campaign has reserved about $7.5 million in advertising time the week of July 4, according to advertising records reviewed Tuesday by CMAG/Kantar Media, a company that tracks political advertising. Clinton’s super PAC, Priorities USA, plans to spend $5.5 million, with both groups devoting most of their cash to Florida and Ohio.

The billionaire’s campaign has yet to air a single general-election advertisement, and has none booked for next week, according to CMAG/Kantar Media, nor do any of his super PACs. Trump has not bought TV advertising since early May spots in Indiana and Nebraska.

Trump’s campaign did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Trump, who reversed his pledge to self-fund his campaign after securing the Republican presidential nomination, is trying to assemble a fundraising operation at an unprecedented speed. The candidate and his joint fundraising committee with the Republican National Committee raised at least $11 million as of last week.

As of the end of last month, his campaign had only $1.3 million in its coffers, compared to $42 million for Clinton, according to Federal Election Commission filings.

Traditional Republican interest groups are not giving Trump any cover, either. The Freedom Partners Action Fund, a super PAC financed by the political network of Charles and David Koch, began a $3.9 million advertising round this week – but for Senate candidates in Ohio and Nevada, not for the presumptive Republican presidential nominee.

The Senate Leadership Fund, a super PAC tied to Republican strategist Karl Rove, announced Tuesday that it would reserve about $40 million in advertising for Senate candidates this fall. Rove’s allied groups that typically back the Republican presidential nominee have not yet engaged on Trump’s behalf.