donald trump elizabeth warren _00001601.jpg
donald trump elizabeth warren _00001601.jpg
Now playing
02:18
Trump takes a swipe at Clinton, Warren and Martinez
TV3
Now playing
01:01
Clinton: Children treated as political pawns
AUSTIN, TX - NOVEMBER 17:  Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton signs copies of her new book 'What Happened' at BookPeople on November 17, 2017 in Austin, Texas.  (Photo by Rick Kern/WireImage)
Rick Kern/WireImage/WireImage
AUSTIN, TX - NOVEMBER 17: Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton signs copies of her new book 'What Happened' at BookPeople on November 17, 2017 in Austin, Texas. (Photo by Rick Kern/WireImage)
Now playing
01:01
Hillary Clinton: That is an outright lie
Bill Clinton CBS Sunay Morning
cbs
Bill Clinton CBS Sunay Morning
Now playing
01:32
Bill Clinton reflects on Trump media coverage
President Donald Trump speaks at a rally at the Gaylord Opryland Resort and Convention Center, Tuesday, May 29, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Andrew Harnik/AP
President Donald Trump speaks at a rally at the Gaylord Opryland Resort and Convention Center, Tuesday, May 29, 2018, in Nashville, Tenn. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)
Now playing
01:06
Trump: I drew in bigger crowds than Jay-Z
Getty Images
Now playing
01:34
Chelsea Clinton slams Ivanka over Trump support
CNNI
Now playing
01:39
Hillary Clinton trolls Trump with Russian hat
AUSTIN, TX - NOVEMBER 17:  Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton signs copies of her new book 'What Happened' at BookPeople on November 17, 2017 in Austin, Texas.  (Photo by Rick Kern/WireImage)
Rick Kern/WireImage/WireImage
AUSTIN, TX - NOVEMBER 17: Former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Rodham Clinton signs copies of her new book 'What Happened' at BookPeople on November 17, 2017 in Austin, Texas. (Photo by Rick Kern/WireImage)
Now playing
01:29
Clinton: Trump parrots what Putin says
US Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton makes a concession speech after being defeated by Republican President-elect Donald Trump, as former President Bill Clinton looks on in New York on November 9, 2016. / AFP / JEWEL SAMAD        (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images
US Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton makes a concession speech after being defeated by Republican President-elect Donald Trump, as former President Bill Clinton looks on in New York on November 9, 2016. / AFP / JEWEL SAMAD (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:01
Clinton: What went right, wrong in 2016
ST LOUIS, MO - OCTOBER 09:  Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (R) speaks as Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump looks on during the town hall debate at Washington University on October 9, 2016 in St Louis, Missouri. This is the second of three presidential debates scheduled prior to the November 8th election.  (Photo by Rick Wilking-Pool/Getty Images)
Pool/Getty Images
ST LOUIS, MO - OCTOBER 09: Democratic presidential nominee former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton (R) speaks as Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump looks on during the town hall debate at Washington University on October 9, 2016 in St Louis, Missouri. This is the second of three presidential debates scheduled prior to the November 8th election. (Photo by Rick Wilking-Pool/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:07
Clinton: I was thinking 'back up, you creep'
Podesta talks Trump and Clinton_00055625.jpg
Podesta talks Trump and Clinton_00055625.jpg
Now playing
07:09
Podesta: Clinton is under Trump's skin
Comedy Central
Now playing
01:05
Trevor Noah on the benefit of Trump's tweets
Drew Angerer/Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images
Now playing
02:59
Clinton and Trump aides clash
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks before introducing his newly selected vice presidential running mate Mike Pence, governor of Indiana, during an event at the Hilton Midtown Hotel, July 16, 2016 in New York City.
Drew Angerer/Getty Images
Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump speaks before introducing his newly selected vice presidential running mate Mike Pence, governor of Indiana, during an event at the Hilton Midtown Hotel, July 16, 2016 in New York City.
Now playing
02:52
Push back on Trump's voter fraud allegations
MANCHESTER, NH - APRIL 12: Donald Trump speaks at the Freedom Summit at The Executive Court Banquet Facility April 12, 2014 in Manchester, New Hampshire. The Freedom Summit held its inaugural event where national conservative leaders bring together grassroots activists on the eve of tax day. Photo by Darren McCollester/Getty Images)
Darren McCollester/Getty Images/FILE
MANCHESTER, NH - APRIL 12: Donald Trump speaks at the Freedom Summit at The Executive Court Banquet Facility April 12, 2014 in Manchester, New Hampshire. The Freedom Summit held its inaugural event where national conservative leaders bring together grassroots activists on the eve of tax day. Photo by Darren McCollester/Getty Images)
Now playing
01:38
Trump tweets slam Clinton over recount
US Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (R) and US Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump shake hands at the end of the second presidential debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, on October 9, 2016. / AFP / Robyn Beck        (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images
US Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton (R) and US Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump shake hands at the end of the second presidential debate at Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri, on October 9, 2016. / AFP / Robyn Beck (Photo credit should read ROBYN BECK/AFP/Getty Images)
Now playing
06:14
Duffy: I'm with Trump - don't go after Clinton

Story highlights

The United Auto Workers Union endorsed Hillary Clinton on Wednesday

The endorsement could be seen as a slight to presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump

(CNN) —  

The United Auto Workers Union endorsed Hillary Clinton on Wednesday, touting the Democratic front-runner as the “best choice for our members and our nation in the November election.”

The endorsement could be seen as a slight to presumptive Republican nominee Donald Trump, who is expected to make a significant push for working class workers in states like Michigan, Pennsylvania and Ohio, areas with high concentrations of UAW workers. Trump, the head of UAW said, did not return a questionnaire to the union.

“Hillary Clinton understands our issues on trade, understands the complexities of multinational economies and supports American workers, their families and communities,” Dennis Williams, UAW president, said in a statement. “Mr. Trump clearly does not support the economic security of UAW families.”

Clinton accepted the endorsement in a statement on Wednesday, pledging to punish countries like China who violate international trade laws and “give American workers a level playing field.”

“Autoworkers need more than tough talk on trade,” Clinton said. “They need a president who knows how to compete and win for American workers.”

Despite the Clinton endorsement, Williams said in an interview with MSNBC that an internal poll of the organization found 28% of members would back Trump. Williams said trade and immigration – two issues Trump speaks about regularly – are reasons their membership is drawn to the businessman.

Clinton has, at times, focused on auto production during her primary race against Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, especially during contests in Michigan, Indiana, Pennsylvania and Ohio.

“It is now our challenge to figure out how we are going to keep those jobs, grow those jobs, support those businesses, support those workers, support those unions so that we can have a renaissance in manufacturing,” Clinton said in Hammond, Indiana, last month. “I believe passionately we can do this.”

The Trump campaign is counting on white, working class voters in order to defeat Clinton in November, especially those in swing states.

A CNN/ORC poll release earlier this month found Trump gets 52% of white voters with Clinton getting 43%. By contrast, Romney won 59% of white voters in 2012, beating President Barack Obama solidly among white men and women.