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(CNN) —  

Democratic and Republican voters in Michigan and Mississippi expressed broad concerns about the economy and believed trade with other countries takes jobs from the U.S., but diverged on most other concerns, according to early exit poll results Tuesday night.

Republicans voting in Mississippi and Michigan said they were broadly angry or dissatisfied with the federal government, according to early exit poll results. In Mississippi, close to half of voters said they were angry with the government, while in Michigan, that number dropped to almost one-third of voters. But big numbers said they were either angry or dissatisfied with the government, with almost 9 in 10 saying they felt that way in both states.

READ MORE: Full exit poll results

But Democrats voting in the two contests overwhelmingly said they were looking for someone to continue President Barack Obama’s policies. In Mississippi, more than 9 in 10 Democratic voters said they wanted someone to continue on Obama’s track or be more liberal. And in Michigan that number was roughly 8 in 10.

The Economy

Republicans in both states also raised broad concerns about the economy, but Republicans in Mississippi were more likely to be worried about the issue. Roughly 8 in 10 Mississippi voters said they were worried, but only two-thirds in Michigan said they were worried – and majorities in both states said that trade with other countries was taking away jobs from the U.S.

Among Democrats, roughly 8 in 10 Mississippi and Michigan voters said they were either somewhat or very worried about the economy and generally felt that trade takes away U.S. jobs.

Republicans in Michigan and Mississippi split on their views of immigration, however. In Mississippi, a majority say that immigrants working in the U.S. illegally should be deported. But most Republican voters in Michigan said those here illegally should be allowed to apply for legal status.

The Democrats and The Republicans

In Michigan, Bernie Sanders performed strongly among voters who said that international trade cost jobs in the U.S. winning roughly 6 in 10 voters who felt that way. But Hillary Clinton won almost two-thirds of Michigan voters who said they wanted someone to continue Obama’s policies.

Sanders also did well among black voters under the age of 45 in Michigan, splitting their support with Clinton – however Clinton performed well with older black voters, winning roughly 8 in 10.

Sanders won by an almost 4:1 ratio Michigan voters who said they wanted someone honest and trustworthy and got more than 5 in 10 voters who said they were looking someone who “cares about people like me.

Clinton won handily in Mississippi with almost 90% support from African American voters, who accounted for almost 70% of voters there, almost 90% of voters over the age of 65 and almost two-thirds of voters who said their top quality was someone who honest trustworthy.

In Michigan, Donald Trump won almost 4 in 10 voters in three key categories: they were very worried about the economy, say that international trade cost U.S. jobs and felt betrayed by the Republican Party.

Meanwhile, in Mississippi, Trump won almost one half of white evangelical voters, almost 6 in 10 voters who are angry with the government, and almost two-thirds of voters looking for an outsider.

Race and Religion

In Michigan, almost 7 in 10 Democratic voters were white and roughly 2 in 10 were black. But in Mississippi roughly one-third of voters were white and a little more than 6 in 10 were black.

Roughly three-quarters of Mississippi Republican identified as white evangelical and nearly 8 in 10 said it was important that a candidate share their beliefs. But about half of Michigan voters said they were white evangelicals and a small majority said it was important the candidates share their beliefs.

The exit poll results reflect a sampling of voters in Michigan and Mississippi and the exact numbers could change before the end of the night, but the broader trends are likely to stay the same.