North Korea planning terror attack on South, spy agency says

Updated 5:41 PM EST, Thu February 18, 2016
South Korean conservative activists shout slogans with placards showing portraits of North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un during a rally denouncing North Korea's hydrogen bomb test, in Seoul on January 7, 2016. The US and South Korean presidents vowed on January 7 to impose the "most powerful and comprehensive" sanctions on North Korea after its globally condemned fourth nuclear test. AFP PHOTO / JUNG YEON-JE / AFP / JUNG YEON-JE        (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)
JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/AFP/Getty Images
South Korean conservative activists shout slogans with placards showing portraits of North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un during a rally denouncing North Korea's hydrogen bomb test, in Seoul on January 7, 2016. The US and South Korean presidents vowed on January 7 to impose the "most powerful and comprehensive" sanctions on North Korea after its globally condemned fourth nuclear test. AFP PHOTO / JUNG YEON-JE / AFP / JUNG YEON-JE (Photo credit should read JUNG YEON-JE/AFP/Getty Images)
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Story highlights

NIS warning covered targets including subways, shopping malls, exhibition centers, power plants

Seoul recently vowed to take "bone-numbing" measures against Pyongyang following last month's nuclear test

(CNN) —  

North Korea is currently planning a “terrorist attack” on South Korea according to the South’s spy agency.  

A lawmaker, briefed by the National Intelligence Service (NIS), says leader Kim Jong Un himself gave the order to make preparations.

“North Korea’s terrorist attack could be in the form of causing harms to anti-North Korean activists, North Korean defectors or government officials,” said Saenuri Party member, Lee Chul-woo, when CNN contacted his office Thursday.  

Members of the ruling Saenuri Party held a closed-door meeting with the NIS, defense ministry and other ministries.

The NIS warning covered a large number of possible targets, including “subways, shopping malls, exhibition centers, power plants” as well as possible cyber attacks.

READ: U.S. F-22s fly low in a show of force over South Korea

South Korean vow 

Seoul recently vowed to take “bone-numbing” measures against Pyongyang following last month’s nuclear test and this month’s satellite launch, both of which Seoul says violate United Nations Security Council resolutions.

South Korea decided to shut down its final symbol of co-operation with the North last week, the Kaesong Industrial Complex, which lies on the North’s side of the border.  The very next day North Korea expelled all South Korean workers, seizing all property and assets.   The North cut key lines of communication with the South the same day.

READ: South Korea: North using Kaesong wages to buy weapons

South Korea’s Presidential office said this latest NIS assessment highlights how important it is to pass an anti-terrorism bill they have been pushing for for some time. 

Kim Sung-woo, a senior secretary at the Presidential office, known as the Blue House, said the law needs to be passed “so that there could be a legal and institutional framework on anti-terrorism so that it can protect our people’s lives and property.”

READ: Why North Korea’s satellite launch is troubling

Opposition parties have voiced concern that an anti-terrorism bill could give too much authority to the NIS.