Experts at the Atlanta-based Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are warning that the spread of the Zika virus to the U.S. could get worse before it gets better.
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ROSLAN RAHMAN/AFP/AFP/Getty Images
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MCALLEN, TX - APRIL 14:  A city environmental health worker displays literature to be distrubuted to the public on April 14, 2016 in McAllen, Texas. Health departments, especially in areas along the Texas-Mexico border, are preparing for the expected arrival of the Zika Virus, carried by the aegypti mosquito, which is endemic to the region. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC), announced this week that Zika is the definitive cause of birth defects seen in Brazil and other countries affected by the outbreak.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
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MCALLEN, TX - APRIL 14: A city environmental health worker displays literature to be distrubuted to the public on April 14, 2016 in McAllen, Texas. Health departments, especially in areas along the Texas-Mexico border, are preparing for the expected arrival of the Zika Virus, carried by the aegypti mosquito, which is endemic to the region. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control (CDC), announced this week that Zika is the definitive cause of birth defects seen in Brazil and other countries affected by the outbreak. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
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Story highlights

Proclamation is "a preventative measure," governor's office says

Hawaii is also trying to eradicate dengue fever

(CNN) —  

The governor of Hawaii has signed an emergency proclamation regarding Zika and other mosquito-borne illnesses.

Gov. David Ige signed the declaration Friday as “a preventative measure” to guard against Zika, dengue fever and other diseases, his office said in a statement.

The action follows the recent decision by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to take emergency steps to prepare for and mitigate the Zika risk, the statement said.

“There have been no locally acquired Zika cases in the U.S. or Hawaii, and we’d like to keep it that way,” the new release quoted the governor as saying. “This is about getting in front of the situation across the state.”

5 things to know about Zika

However, there have been some cases of dengue fever on the island of Hawaii. The statement from the governor’s offce said such cases “continue to be fewer” and further between, but the battle to break the cycle of transmission continues.

The Zika virus is prompting worldwide concern because of an alarming connection to a neurological birth disorder and its rapid spread across the globe.

The World Health Organization described it as an “extraordinary event” while declaring a public health emergency this month.

What real threat does Zika pose to the Rio Olympics?