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Story highlights

In total, the two gave 729 speeches from February 2001 until May, receiving an average payday of $210,795 for each address

The two also reported at least $7.7 million for at least 39 speeches to big banks, including Goldman Sachs and UBS

(CNN) —  

Hillary Clinton and her husband, former President Bill Clinton, combined to earn more than $153 million in paid speeches from 2001 until Hillary Clinton launched her presidential campaign last spring, a CNN analysis shows.

In total, the two gave 729 speeches from February 2001 until May, receiving an average payday of $210,795 for each address. The two also reported at least $7.7 million for at least 39 speeches to big banks, including Goldman Sachs and UBS, with Hillary Clinton, the Democratic 2016 front-runner, collecting at least $1.8 million for at least eight speeches to big banks.

The analysis was made at a time when Hillary Clinton has been under scrutiny for her ties to Wall Street, which has been a major focus of Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders on the campaign trail.

“What being part of the establishment is, is in the last quarter, having a super PAC that raised $15 million from Wall Street, that throughout one’s life raised a whole lot of money from the drug companies and other special interests,” Sanders said at Thursday’s Democratic debate hosted by MSNBC.

Sanders: Clinton is ‘funded by Wall Street’

The former secretary of state testily responded to Sanders’ charges.

“Time and time again, by innuendo, by insinuation, there is this attack that he is putting forth which really comes down to, you know, anybody who ever took donations or speaking fees from any interest group has to be bought. And I just absolutely reject that, senator, and I really don’t think these kinds of attacks by insinuation are worthy of you. And enough is enough,” Clinton said.

She then challenged him: “If you’ve got something to say, say it directly, but you will not find that I ever changed a view or a vote because of any donation I ever received.”

That time Sanders voted for Bill Clinton’s plan to loosen regulation on Wall Street

The Clinton campaign has been noncommittal about releasing transcripts of the paid speeches and Clinton has told reporters that she will “look into” making her remarks public.

CNN’s Dan Merica and Eugene Scott contributed to this report.