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Washington CNN —  

As Valentine’s Day approaches, Alicia Keys is spreading her love to none other than House Speaker Paul Ryan.

In a video for WeAreHereMovement.com, Keys calls on Ryan to bring criminal justice reform legislation to a vote. Keys started “We Are Here” in 2014 to channel her music and her fans to civil rights and social justice causes.

In the video, the R&B singer-songwriter issues a white-and-gold Valentine to Ryan, with the words “You have a heart of gold,” and asks others to send in their Valentines as well.

“Help bring justice reform to a vote so we can keep families together and reunite those that have been torn apart by excessive incarceration instead of just getting the help they needed,” Keys tells Ryan.

“I recently saw a pictures of you working out and I was like, hmm, I never saw the speaker of the House working out – he must be cool,” Keys says. “Are you cool Paul? Show me how cool you are.”

The “Empire State of Mind” singer tells the 46-year-old Ryan, who is known for his intensive work out and heath food regimen, she will be his Valentine if he helps her “spread some love.”

Keys, who is no stranger to political activism, joins a growing group of celebrities speaking out on this issue.

CHECK OUT: Artists get political

At a time of partisan gridlock on Capitol Hill, the issue of criminal justice reform is one that generates some bipartisan support.

The Democrats in the presidential race, Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders, have both advocated for criminal justice reform. Both have met with #BlackLivesMatter activists and earned endorsements from civil rights leaders and the families of unarmed black men who were killed by police.

On the Republican side, candidates like New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, who has touted his reform efforts in New Jersey, have declared the war on drugs a failure. Kentucky Sen. Rand Paul, who dropped out of the presidential race Wednesday, has also long been an advocate for criminal justice reform.

RELATED: What Rand Paul thinks is the biggest mistake for GOP

While he is no longer in the race, Paul is running for reelection in the Senate and continues to be vocal about this issue. Paul visited Ferguson, Missouri, following the shooting death of Michael Brown and blamed politicians’ inaction for the “tragedy.”