title: President Obama's Interview With NPR's Steve Inskeep - December 2015 duration: 00:37:00 site: Youtube author: null published: Fri Dec 18 2015 17:58:59 GMT-0500 (Eastern Standard Time) intervention: yes description: In a wide-ranging, year-end interview with NPR, the president says he makes "no apologies" for going after ISIS "appropriately and in a way that is consistent with American values." The interview comes as Obama's strategy to fight terror is receiving low approval from the public and fierce criticism from the right for not being more forceful. The president also discusses his concern that campus activists aren't hearing other points of view, the legacy of his climate deal and why he feels Donald Trump is "exploiting" the ang
NPR
title: President Obama's Interview With NPR's Steve Inskeep - December 2015 duration: 00:37:00 site: Youtube author: null published: Fri Dec 18 2015 17:58:59 GMT-0500 (Eastern Standard Time) intervention: yes description: In a wide-ranging, year-end interview with NPR, the president says he makes "no apologies" for going after ISIS "appropriately and in a way that is consistent with American values." The interview comes as Obama's strategy to fight terror is receiving low approval from the public and fierce criticism from the right for not being more forceful. The president also discusses his concern that campus activists aren't hearing other points of view, the legacy of his climate deal and why he feels Donald Trump is "exploiting" the ang
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A man from Lancashire who encouraged Islamic extremists to wage jihad in the West, including targeting Prince George and injecting poison in to supermarket ice-cream, has been convicted today (31 May).
Husnain Rashid, 32, posted messages online glorifying successful terrorist atrocities committed by others while encouraging and inciting his readers to plan and commit attacks.
One of his posts included a photograph of Prince George, along with the address of his school, a black silhouette of a jihad fighter and the message ìeven the royal family will not be left aloneî.
His common theme was that attacks could be carried out by one individual acting alone. Rashid suggested perpetrators had the option of using poisons, vehicles, weapons, bombs, chemicals or knives. Rashid uploaded terrorist material to an online library he created with the goal of helping others plan an attack.
He also planned to travel to Turkey and Syria with the intention of fighting in Daesh-controlled territories. He contacted individuals he believed to be in Daesh territory, seeking advice on how to reach Syria and how to obtain the required authorisation necessary to join a fighting group.
Rashid provided one individual who had travelled to Syria and was known online as ìRepunzelî, with information about methods of shooting down aircraft and jamming missile systems.
All the offences relate to Rashidís activities online between October 2016 and his arrest in November 2017.
Rashidís trial started on 23 May at Woolwich Crown Court but he changed his plea to guilty on four counts on 31 May. He will be sentenced on 28 June.
Sue Hemming from the CPS said: ìHusnain Rashid is an extremist who not only sought to encourage others to commit attacks on targets in the West but was planning to travel aboard so he could fight himself.
ìHe tried to argue that he had not done anything illegal but with the overwhelming weight of evidence against him he changed his plea to guilty.
ìThe judge will now deci
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A man from Lancashire who encouraged Islamic extremists to wage jihad in the West, including targeting Prince George and injecting poison in to supermarket ice-cream, has been convicted today (31 May). Husnain Rashid, 32, posted messages online glorifying successful terrorist atrocities committed by others while encouraging and inciting his readers to plan and commit attacks. One of his posts included a photograph of Prince George, along with the address of his school, a black silhouette of a jihad fighter and the message ìeven the royal family will not be left aloneî. His common theme was that attacks could be carried out by one individual acting alone. Rashid suggested perpetrators had the option of using poisons, vehicles, weapons, bombs, chemicals or knives. Rashid uploaded terrorist material to an online library he created with the goal of helping others plan an attack. He also planned to travel to Turkey and Syria with the intention of fighting in Daesh-controlled territories. He contacted individuals he believed to be in Daesh territory, seeking advice on how to reach Syria and how to obtain the required authorisation necessary to join a fighting group. Rashid provided one individual who had travelled to Syria and was known online as ìRepunzelî, with information about methods of shooting down aircraft and jamming missile systems. All the offences relate to Rashidís activities online between October 2016 and his arrest in November 2017. Rashidís trial started on 23 May at Woolwich Crown Court but he changed his plea to guilty on four counts on 31 May. He will be sentenced on 28 June. Sue Hemming from the CPS said: ìHusnain Rashid is an extremist who not only sought to encourage others to commit attacks on targets in the West but was planning to travel aboard so he could fight himself. ìHe tried to argue that he had not done anything illegal but with the overwhelming weight of evidence against him he changed his plea to guilty. ìThe judge will now deci
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FILE - In this undated file photo released by a militant website, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, militants of the Islamic State group hold up their weapons and wave flags on their vehicles in a convoy on a road leading to Iraq, while riding in Raqqa, Syria. Simultaneous attacks on the Islamic State-held city of Mosul in Iraq and Raqqa, the de facto IS capital across the border in eastern Syria, would make military sense: They would make it harder for the extremists to move reinforcements and deny them a safe haven. (Militant website via AP, File)
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FILE - In this undated file photo released by a militant website, which has been verified and is consistent with other AP reporting, militants of the Islamic State group hold up their weapons and wave flags on their vehicles in a convoy on a road leading to Iraq, while riding in Raqqa, Syria. Simultaneous attacks on the Islamic State-held city of Mosul in Iraq and Raqqa, the de facto IS capital across the border in eastern Syria, would make military sense: They would make it harder for the extremists to move reinforcements and deny them a safe haven. (Militant website via AP, File)
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(FILES) This image grab taken from a propaganda video released on July 5, 2014 by al-Furqan Media allegedly shows the leader of the Islamic State (IS) jihadist group, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, aka Caliph Ibrahim, adressing Muslim worshippers at a mosque in the militant-held northern Iraqi city of Mosul. 
The Russian army on June 16, 2017 said it hit Islamic State leaders in an airstrike in Syria last month and was seeking to verify whether IS chief Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi had been killed. In a statement, the army said Sukhoi warplanes carried out a 10-minute night-time strike on May 28 at a location near Raqa, where IS leaders had gathered to plan a pullout by militants from the group's stronghold.
 / AFP PHOTO / AL-FURQAN MEDIA / --/AFP/Getty Images
(FILES) This image grab taken from a propaganda video released on July 5, 2014 by al-Furqan Media allegedly shows the leader of the Islamic State (IS) jihadist group, Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi, aka Caliph Ibrahim, adressing Muslim worshippers at a mosque in the militant-held northern Iraqi city of Mosul. The Russian army on June 16, 2017 said it hit Islamic State leaders in an airstrike in Syria last month and was seeking to verify whether IS chief Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi had been killed. In a statement, the army said Sukhoi warplanes carried out a 10-minute night-time strike on May 28 at a location near Raqa, where IS leaders had gathered to plan a pullout by militants from the group's stronghold. / AFP PHOTO / AL-FURQAN MEDIA / --/AFP/Getty Images
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Story highlights

President Barack Obama acknowledges that his administration may have fumbled its anti-ISIS communications strategy

But Obama insist the plan itself was working in an interview with NPR

Praise for one of his critics: Sen. "Lindsey Graham one of the few who has been at least honest ..."

Honolulu CNN —  

President Barack Obama on Monday aired his most candid assessment to date about Republican frontrunner Donald Trump, charging in a radio interview the billionaire businessman was capitalizing on economic fears of white men to fuel his presidential campaign.

Offering his first explicit reaction to Trump since the candidate proposed a ban on all Muslims entering the country, Obama said such ideas are a blatant appeal to Americans’ fears. Describing in general the reflexive opposition to his agenda from Republicans, Obama argued that some of that enmity was rooted in his position as the first African-American president.

“Blue-collar men have had a lot of trouble in this new economy, where they are no longer getting the same bargain that they got when they were going to a factory and able to support their families on a single paycheck,” he told National Public Radio in an interview taped before he departed for his winter vacation in Hawaii.

“There is going to be potential anger, frustration, fear. Some of it justified, but just misdirected. I think somebody like Mr. Trump is taking advantage of that,” Obama said. “That’s what he’s exploiting during the course of his campaign.”

Speaking more broadly – and not explicitly about Trump – Obama identified elements of Republican antagonism that he said could be fueled by ingrained resistance to an African-American commander in chief, citing “specific strains in the Republican Party that suggest that somehow I’m different, I’m Muslim, I’m disloyal to the country.”

“In some ways, I may represent change that worries them,” he said.

“I think if you are talking about the specific virulence of some of the opposition directed towards me, then, you know, that may be explained by the particulars of who I am,” he added later.

The President acknowledged earlier in the sit-down interview that his administration may have fumbled its anti-ISIS communications strategy, but he insisted the plan itself was working and suggested saturated media coverage of the group could be fueling terror fears in the United States.

In the past few weeks, the White House has sought to step up its messaging efforts on counterterrorism, scheduling a prime-time television address and visits to the Pentagon and National Counterterrorism Center in an attempt to better explain progress made against the Islamic State group.

But Obama conceded those efforts, prompted by an ISIS-inspired attack that killed 14 people in San Bernardino, California, came after inadequate efforts to relay the work of a U.S.-led coalition in combating ISIS.

“We haven’t on a regular basis, I think, described all the work that we’ve been doing for more than a year now to defeat ISIL,” Obama told NPR. He called the communications blunder a “legitimate criticism of what I’ve been doing and our administration has been doing.”

But he also pinned Americans’ renewed unease about terror attacks on U.S. soil to blanket media coverage of ISIS attacks. The November ISIS terrorist massacre in Paris, which left 130 people dead, led to “a saturation of news about the horrible attack there,” Obama said in the interview.

Mapping 50 ISIS attacks

“If you’ve been watching television for the last month, all you have been seeing, all you have been hearing about is these guys with masks or black flags who are potentially coming to get you,” he said in the NPR interview. “So I understand why people are concerned about it.”

“Look, the media is pursuing ratings,” he added later. “This is a legitimate news story. I think that, you know, it’s up to the media to make a determination about how they want to cover things.”

Public relations push from Oval Office

Obama has come under fire from Republicans for his ISIS strategy, which they have labeled weak and ineffective. But even some Democrats, namely those lawmakers up for re-election next year, have privately worried that Obama has appeared flat-footed in responding to the terror rampages in France and California.

A public relations push to better explain his plan, which began with a rare Oval Office address at the beginning of December, came as Americans increasingly said in polls they doubted his ability to protect them from terrorist attacks.

But he’s resisted calls to fundamentally alter his strategy against ISIS, which has relied on airstrikes and small numbers of special operations forces to take out key ISIS leaders. He’s castigated GOP opponents of his plan for not laying out specifics of their own proposals and deemed what they have offered as untenable.

“If the suggestion is that we kill tens or hundreds of thousands of innocent Syrians and Iraqis, that is not who we are and that would be a strategy that would have enormous backlash against the United States. It would be terrible for our national security,” he said in the interview.

He offered slight praise for one GOP candidate, Sen. Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, for offering up specifics of a plan, which would include sending at least 10,000 U.S. ground troops to fight ISIS. The interview was taped and aired before Graham announced Monday he was dropping out of the race.

“Lindsey Graham one of the few who has been at least honest about suggesting: here is something I would do that the President is not doing. He doesn’t just talk about being louder or sounding tougher in the process,” he said.