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Officer explains why Freddie Gray wasn't in seat belt

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William Porter was the first Baltimore officer to face trial; a hung jury resulted in a mistrial

Five other officers to face trial on charges ranging from misconduct to second-degree murder

CNN —  

Six police officers have been charged in the death of Freddie Gray, with the charges ranging from misconduct in office to second-degree depraved-heart murder, according to documents from Marilyn Mosby, the state’s attorney for Baltimore.

“Our investigation revealed that we had enough probable cause to bring charges against the six officers,” Mosby said when the charges came down in May. “The grand jury, who also concluded there is sufficient evidence for probable cause, returned indictments on all counts presented to them.”

Here is rundown of the six officers and the charges they face.

Officer William G. Porter

Baltimore Police Department

Porter, 25, has been on the force since 2012. He was the first to face trial in Gray’s April death. It ended in a mistrial on December 16, and it’s up to prosecutors whether to retry him.

According to authorities, Porter responded when the driver of the van carrying Gray asked for assistance to check on the prisoner. Officials say Porter asked Gray whether he needed a medic, Gray responded that he did, and Porter helped Gray onto a bench in the police van but did not call for medical assistance.

He faces charges of:

• Involuntary manslaughter

• Second-degree assault

• Misconduct in office

• Reckless endangerment

Convictions on the manslaughter and assault charges each carry maximum sentences of 10 years. His bail was set at $350,000.

Officer Caesar R. Goodson

Baltimore Police Department

Goodson, 46, has been on the force since 1999. He is slated to be the second officer to face trial, set for January 6.

He was the driver of the van carrying Gray, and prosecutors say that despite stopping the wagon to check on Gray, “at no point did he seek nor did he render any medical assistance.”

He faces charges of:

• Second-degree depraved-heart murder

• Involuntary manslaughter

• Second-degree assault

• Manslaughter by vehicle (gross negligence)

• Manslaughter by vehicle (criminal negligence)

• Misconduct in office

• Reckless endangerment

A conviction on the murder charge commands a maximum sentence of up to 30 years in prison, while two of the manslaughter charges and the assault charge are each punishable by up to a decade in prison. His bail was set at $350,000.

Officer Garrett E. Miller

Baltimore Police Department

Miller, 26, has been on the force since 2012.

He was one of three officers on bicycle patrol when Gray was arrested, and he placed Gray in a restraining technique known as a “leg lace” before Gray was placed in the van, Mosby has said.

He faces charges of:

• Second-degree assault

• Misconduct in office (two counts)

• Reckless endangerment

Convictions on the assault charges are punishable by up to 10 years in prison per count. His bail was set at $250,000.

Sgt. Alicia D. White

Baltimore Police Department

White, 30, has been on the force since 2010.

She and two other officers saw Gray unresponsive on the floor of the wagon, and when White spoke to Gray and he did not respond, she allegedly did nothing to help him, despite previously being advised that Gray needed a medic, prosecutors say.

She faces charges of:

• Involuntary manslaughter

• Second-degree assault

• Misconduct in office

• Reckless endangerment

The manslaughter and assault charges carry maximum sentences of 10 years each. Her bail was set at $350,000.

Officer Edward M. Nero

Baltimore Police Department

Nero, 30, has been on the force since 2012.

Another of the officers on bicycle patrol, Nero allegedly held Gray down until the transport van arrived, and he helped cuff and shackle Gray, prosecutors say.

He faces charges of:

• Second-degree assault

• Misconduct in office (two counts)

• Reckless endangerment

The assault charges carry maximum sentences of 10 years per count. Nero’s bail was set at $250,000.

Lt. Brian W. Rice

Baltimore Police Department

Rice, 42, has been on the force since 1997.

Also on bike patrol at the time of Gray’s arrest, Rice and his colleagues failed to establish probable cause before arresting Gray, rendering the apprehension illegal, Mosby has said. Rice also helped cuff and shackle Gray before placing him face down on the floor of the wagon, prosecutors allege.

He faces charges of:

• Involuntary manslaughter

• Second-degree assault

• Misconduct in office (two counts)

• Reckless endangerment

A conviction on the manslaughter charge or the assault charges would draw maximum sentences of 10 years each, per count. Rice’s bail was set at $350,000.

An earlier version of this story contained outdated information on the charges the six officers are facing.