Hillary Clinton outlines plan to stop ISIS from recruiting online

Updated 11:28 PM EST, Tue December 15, 2015
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Story highlights

Clinton stepped deeper into the debate over terrorism with the speech, offering what her campaign aides called a "360-degree strategy to keep America safe"

Terrorist attacks in San Bernardino, California, and Paris have dramatically altered the tenor of the 2016 campaign

(CNN) —  

Hillary Clinton argued Tuesday that the U.S. can stop homegrown terrorism, outlining a plan to combat domestic radicalization two weeks after two ISIS-inspired terrorists killed 14 people in San Bernardino, California.

In a speech that was part policy, part politics, Clinton contrasted herself directly with Republicans running for president, stating that Muslim-Americans are the “first, last and best defense against homegrown radicalization and terrorism.”

“I am confident once again we will choose resolve over fear,” Clinton said in remarks at the University of Minnesota-Minneapolis. “And we will defeat these new enemies just as we have defeated those who have threatened us in the past, because it is not enough to contain ISIS – we must defeat ISIS.”

Opinion: Does Clinton’s strategy for beating ISIS add up?

Clinton stepped deeper into the debate over terrorism with the speech, offering what her campaign aides called a “360-degree strategy to keep America safe,” including how she will work to discover and disrupt terrorist plots before they happen and how she will work with Muslim-American communities to fight radicalization.

As a way to stop terrorists from entering the United States, Clinton also proposed more strict screening of anyone entering the country who had visited a country known to be a hotbed for terrorism.

One key to Clinton’s plan is ending ISIS radicalization online, including by shutting down ISIS-inspired Facebook and Twitter profiles and removing terrorist content.

“Our security professionals need to more effectively track and analyze ISIS’ social media posts and map jihadist networks,” Clinton said. “We have to stop jihadists from radicalizing new recruits in person and through social media, chat rooms and what is called the dark web. To do that we need stronger relationships between Washington, Silicon Valley and all of our great tech companies.”

Clinton also took subtle swipes at Republicans’ rhetoric on ISIS, telling the audience that “shallow slogans don’t add up to a strategy.”

“Promising to carpet bomb until the desert glows doesn’t make you sound strong, it makes you sound like you’re in over your head,” Clinton said, referencing a comment Sen. Ted Cruz made earlier this month. “Bluster and bigotry are not credentials for becoming commander-and-chief and it is hard to take serious senators who talk tough but then hold up key national security nominations.”