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Story highlights

In statement, university system President Tim Wolfe offers no sign he will resign

Dozens of University of Missouri football players plan to boycott games

African American students want system President Tim Wolfe out over race complaints

(CNN) —  

Black football players at the University of Missouri have joined calls demanding the ouster of the president of the state’s four-campus university system over alleged inaction against racism on campus.

About 30 players made their thoughts known Saturday night in a tweet posted by Missouri’s Legion of Black Collegians.

“The athletes of color on the University of Missouri football team truly believe ‘Injustice Anywhere is a threat to Justice Everywhere,’ ” read the tweet. “We will no longer participate in any football related activities until President Tim Wolfe resigns or is removed due to his negligence toward marginalized students’ experience.”

University of Missouri president steps down amid race row

The players’ move is the latest salvo in a spiraling debate over the experiences of African-American students at Missouri, who have complained of inaction on the part of school leaders in dealing with racism on the overwhelmingly white campus.

Black student leaders have complained of students openly using racial slurs and other incidents. In August, someone used feces to draw a swastika, drawing condemnation from black and Jewish student organizations.

One student is on a hunger strike demanding action. Graduate student Jonathan L. Butler started the hunger strike last week, demanding Wolfe’s removal.

He wrote Missouri officials that “students are not able to achieve their full academic potential because of the inequalities and obstacles they face,” according to the Missourian newspaper in Columbia. “In each of these scenarios, Mr. Wolfe had ample opportunity to create policies and reform that could shift the culture of Mizzou in a positive direction, but in each scenario, he failed to do so.”

On Sunday, Butler accused the school’s leadership of not caring for the student body.

“I’m in this because it’s that serious. We’re dealing with humanity here. And at this point, we can’t afford to continue to work with individuals who just don’t care for their constituents,” he told CNN.

“Regardless of what happens with my life, people are really starting these conversations that are necessary and that’s what’s going to bring about the change in the long term,” Butler said.

It’s not clear what repercussions, if any, could come to the football players if they refuse to play in Missouri’s next football game against Brigham Young University on November 14. Some have called for the students to lose their scholarships.

The school’s athletics department said Saturday that it supports the right of student athletes to “tackle these challenging issues.”

Head football coach Gary Pinkel seemed to be more direct, tweeting a photo Sunday of dozens of white and black students standing arm in arm with the message, “The Mizzou Family stands as one. We are united. We are behind our players.”

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon insisted Friday that the issues must be addressed. Wolfe agreed, but he appeared unwilling to give in to demands that he resign, saying in a statement Sunday that he is “dedicated to ongoing dialogue to address these very complex, societal issues.”

“We are tired of dialogue! We want action,” the student group behind much of the protest, Concerned Student 1950, tweeted Friday.

The group’s name refers to the date African-American students were first admitted to the university.

The long-simmering discussion began to boil over this fall, when the African-American student body president spoke out about racism on campus, according to media reports.

Later, a group of African-American students complained that a school safety officer didn’t more aggressively pursue an apparently drunken white student who disrupted their gathering and used a racial slur in addressing them.

African-American students then disrupted the school’s homecoming parade on October 10, blocking Wolfe’s car in a protest calling for greater action on the part of administrators.

Missouri president Tim Wolfe said that racism does exist at the school.
PHOTO: Jeff Roberson/AP
Missouri president Tim Wolfe said that racism does exist at the school.

They accused Wolfe of looking on impassively and said his car struck one of the protesters. No one was injured, but protesters accused police of using excessive force to disperse protesters.

The top official at the Missouri campus, Chancellor R. Bowen Loftin, ordered mandatory sensitivity training for faculty and students, and Wolfe later apologized.

“Racism does exist at our university, and it is unacceptable,” he said.

African-American students said the gestures were insufficient and issued a set of demands calling for school officials to implement broader cultural sensitivity training, increase minority staffing and take other steps.

In his response Sunday, Wolfe said many of the student group’s demands are already under consideration.

“It is clear to all of us that change is needed, and we appreciate the thoughtfulness and passion which have gone into the sharing of concerns,” his statement said. “My administration has been meeting around the clock and has been doing a tremendous amount of reflection on how to address these complex matters.”

Athletes allege abuse and racism at University of Illinois

The University of Missouri-Columbia has a population of 35,000 students, 17% of whom are minorities, the school says on its website.

Two graduate student groups are calling for walkouts at the university on Monday and Tuesday in solidarity with protesters.

Also Monday, the University of Missouri board of curators will hold an executive session on the Columbia campus.

CNN’s Polo Sandoval contributed to this report.