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Story highlights

Some of the information includes Social Security numbers, passport numbers and addresses of Brennan's family and associates

The hackers are believed to have supplied Wikileaks with this information

Washington CNN —  

WikiLeaks on Wednesday published personal information of CIA Director John Brennan after a brazen hack attack of the top spy’s personal email account.

Though all of the documents predate Brennan’s time in the Obama administration and reveal no classified data, information such as Social Security numbers, passport numbers and addresses of his family and associates is causing great concern within the agency.

Among the documents released online is Brennan’s incomplete SF86, a questionnaire federal employees must fill out in order to gain security clearance. Along with personally identifiable information, this document includes personal information about his health, criminal history, questions about whether he’s used drugs and associations with foreign governments.

Other documents, such as a letter from the vice chairman of the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, a congressional bill from 2008 that would limit interrogation techniques, and a intelligence policy paper were also published but offered little insight into the inner workings of the intelligence community.

The hackers, who claim to have illegally accessed Brennan’s personal server last week, are believed to have supplied WikiLeaks with this information and are threatening to release more documents.

“The hacking of the Brennan family account is a crime and the Brennan family is the victim,” the CIA said in a statement. “The private electronic holdings of the Brennan family were plundered with malicious intent and are now being distributed across the web. This attack is something that could happen to anyone and should be condemned, not promoted. There is no indication that any the documents released thus far are classified. In fact, they appear to be documents that a private citizen with national security interests and expertise would be expected to possess.”

WikiLeaks tweeted late Wednesday afternoon that it planned to release more emails from Brennan.

“Tomorrow we continue our @CIA chief John Brennan email series, including on US strategy in Afghanistan and Pakistan. #AfPak #CIA,” the group said.

CNN’s Evan Perez contributed to this report.