World

How the world has changed in 50 years

Published 7:42 PM ET, Tue October 20, 2015
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A woman in Qingdao, China, practices tai chi by the Yellow Sea in 1981. It's one of the many photographs featured in Hiroji Kubota's new retrospective photo book. Hiroji Kubota/Magnum Photos/Aperture
Kubota has traveled all over the world during a career spanning more than five decades. This image was shot in Utah's Salt Flats in 1989. Hiroji Kubota/Magnum Photos/Aperture
Vietnamese refugees look at the camera in 1975. "You have to be sensitive to subjects you are photographing, particularly when you photograph people," Kubota said. "The moment you photograph, that is a very aggressive kind of behavior. It's contradictory: You have to be sensitive, yet you have to be aggressive." Hiroji Kubota/Magnum Photos/Aperture
Palm Springs, California, in 1989. Built at the foot of Mount San Jacinto, the resort town has been popular with celebrities and politicians, including U.S. Presidents Dwight Eisenhower and Gerald Ford. Hiroji Kubota/Magnum Photos/Aperture
People enjoy spring break at Texas' South Padre Island in 1990. Kubota said he started shooting exclusively in color in 1980. Hiroji Kubota/Magnum Photos/Aperture
A railway station in Harbin, China, in 1981. Hiroji Kubota/Magnum Photos/Aperture
Pedestrians in New York walk on a snowy Wall Street in 1988. Hiroji Kubota/Magnum Photos/Aperture
The colorful Shugakuin Imperial Villa is seen in Kyoto, Japan, in 2009. Japan is Kubota's home country. Hiroji Kubota/Magnum Photos/Aperture
A personal defining moment for Kubota came when he traveled to Burma (now Myanmar) in 1978. It was there where he visited the holy Buddhist Golden Rock at Shwe Pyi Daw. The color film looked "marvelous, very colorful," Kubota said. "Then, I began to photograph color seriously." Hiroji Kubota/Magnum Photos/Aperture
Someone dives into China's Songhua Jiang River in 1981. Hiroji Kubota/Magnum Photos/Aperture
A person prays in Lhasa, Tibet, in 1981. The pose is called "Kechangtou," Kubota said, and it involves people laying on the ground and stretching out their arms and legs to pray. Hiroji Kubota/Magnum Photos/Aperture
Hong Kong's Kai Tak Airport was said to be the most difficult in the world for taking off and landing. This photo was taken in 1996. The airport is now closed. Hiroji Kubota/Magnum Photos/Aperture