pesticide poisoning terminix Virgin Islands ganim nr_00000000.jpg
New pictures inside poisoned villa
02:49 - Source: CNN

Story highlights

Family poisoned by pesticide during March vacation in U.S. Virgin Islands

Methyl bromide, a restricted-use pesticide, was used at their resort

CNN  — 

As two Delaware teens recovering from pesticide poisoning struggle to eat, walk and sit up on their own, an investigation into what went wrong highlights failures on several levels, including lax oversight and a history of corruption at the U.S. Virgin Islands government agency in charge of exterminators.

The teens and their parents fell gravely ill and suffered seizures during a March vacation to St. John. The family was exposed to methyl bromide, a restricted-use pesticide. Recovery from their nerve damage has been slow and agonizing for the whole family, but it’s been the worst for the boys. The brothers were in medically induced comas for weeks. They are now conscious, family attorney James Maron said, but they are barely able to move.

Six months after the horrifying incident, their father, Steve Esmond, is slowly getting better as well, but suffers from severe tremors, struggles to speak and can’t turn the pages of a book, Maron said.

“Neurologically, it’s like being in a torture chamber,” Maron said.

Esmond and his boys are mentally “strong as an ox” and “100% cognizant,” but they are trapped in bodies badly damaged by the nerve agent, Maron said.

Prior to the incident, the boys were athletic stars at their schools. The older brother had big prospects playing lacrosse and was already touring colleges.

Their mother, Teresa Devine, had less exposure to the toxic gas than the rest of the family and has made the strongest recovery, but she spends her days and nights keeping vigil over her boys.

What is methyl bromide?

  • Methyl bromide is a restricted-use pesticide that the U.S. EPA has considered “highly toxic” for more than two decades. Inhalation of methyl bromide, even short-term, can cause severe lung damage, while long-term inhalation can lead to “neurological effects.” Studies on lab animals caused degenerative lesions in the nasal cavity and had effects on the testicles of male animals.
  • Source: EPA

    “They’re extreme fighters, and that’s why they’re hanging on,” Maron said.

    The family was on vacation at the Sirenusa resort on St. John when two employees of the local Terminix fumigated the villa below theirs March 18 with methyl bromide, even though it is not approved for residential use. After the family became ill, the Environmental Protection Agency found traces of the lethal gas in their villa.

    The exposure was so significant inside the treated unit that 6 weeks after the family fell ill, dangerous amounts of methyl bromide were still being detected inside the rental villa, according to EPA documents.

    Methyl bromide is incredibly toxic to humans, said Dr. Reynold Panettieri Jr., the deputy director for the Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology.

    “I would say the prognosis, at best, is guarded,” said Panettieri, who has not personally treated the family. “As we know the victims have been off ventilators and they’ve been improved. But if that dose, even though it appeared to be acute, was over (a period of) hours, the damage to the nerves and to the brain itself may render it irreversibly damaged.”

    Delaware boys in critical condition after resort illness, possibly from pesticide

    Maron said Terminix has agreed to enter mediation, done by Ken Feinberg, who negotiated the settlements for the victims of the September 11 attacks. Mediation begins September 28.