Walker pushes back on flip-flop accusations

Updated 3:10 PM EDT, Sun July 19, 2015
scott walker political issues bash intv sot_00041527.jpg
scott walker political issues bash intv sot_00041527.jpg
Now playing
05:14
Scott Walker talks immigration, abortion
Now playing
01:06
Scott Walker: I am suspending my campaign
scott walker
CNN
scott walker
Now playing
02:52
Sources: Scott Walker expected to end presidential bid
CNN
Now playing
01:58
Walker barely registers in new CNN poll
GOP debate cnn debate 8p 4_00001924.jpg
GOP debate cnn debate 8p 4_00001924.jpg
Now playing
02:11
Walker to Trump: We don't need apprentice in White House
Governor Scott Walker addresses the National Rifle Association (NRA) Leadership Forum on April 13, 2012 in St. Louis, Missouri.
Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images
Governor Scott Walker addresses the National Rifle Association (NRA) Leadership Forum on April 13, 2012 in St. Louis, Missouri.
Now playing
01:36
Get to know Gov. Scott Walker in less than 2 minutes
SOTU's interview with GOP Presidential Candidate Scott Walker
SOTU's interview with GOP Presidential Candidate Scott Walker
Now playing
02:59
Scott Walker ties Obama to cop killings
NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 03:  GOP presidential front-runner Donald Trump exits a news conference in Manhattan after he signed a pledge Thursday to support the Republican nominee in the 2016 general election, ruling out a third-party or independent run on September 3, 2015 in New York City. Trump made the announcement following a meeting with  Republican National Committee chairman Reince Priebus. Trump stressed repeatedly in the news conference that he is leading in all national polls.  (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Spencer Platt/Getty Images North America/Getty Images
NEW YORK, NY - SEPTEMBER 03: GOP presidential front-runner Donald Trump exits a news conference in Manhattan after he signed a pledge Thursday to support the Republican nominee in the 2016 general election, ruling out a third-party or independent run on September 3, 2015 in New York City. Trump made the announcement following a meeting with Republican National Committee chairman Reince Priebus. Trump stressed repeatedly in the news conference that he is leading in all national polls. (Photo by Spencer Platt/Getty Images)
Now playing
02:59
Bush, Walker want to move past summer of Trump
Casey Capachi
Now playing
06:12
Gov. Walker: Terminate Iran deal, re-impose sanctions
The Governor of Wisconsin goes out with SE Cupp to shoot sporting clays
Alexander Rosen/CNN
The Governor of Wisconsin goes out with SE Cupp to shoot sporting clays
Now playing
03:22
How Scott Walker learned to shoot
SOTU's interview with GOP Presidential Candidate Scott Walker
SOTU's interview with GOP Presidential Candidate Scott Walker
Now playing
02:06
Scott Walker: We have a plan to reshape Washington
Scott Walker booed at Iowa State Fair soapbox_00002324.jpg
Scott Walker booed at Iowa State Fair soapbox_00002324.jpg
Now playing
01:00
Scott Walker booed by protesters at Iowa soapbox
scott walker faith bash intv sot_00011009.jpg
scott walker faith bash intv sot_00011009.jpg
Now playing
01:23
Scott Walker talks about his faith
Now playing
05:24
Exclusive inside Gov. Scott Walker's winnebago
Casey Capachi
Now playing
01:59
Scott Walker warms to New Hampshire
roast and ride scott walker pkg_00002124.jpg
roast and ride scott walker pkg_00002124.jpg
Now playing
01:00
Eyes on Scott Walker at Iowa's first 'Roast and Ride'
scott walker iowa intv bash_00002016.jpg
scott walker iowa intv bash_00002016.jpg
Now playing
03:07
Walker: It's easier if you're ahead the whole time
Now playing
03:23
Walker: Success is fewer people dependent on govt.
(CNN) —  

Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker predicts that he can finish first, second or third in all four of the first Republican presidential primary contests.

“I think we can place one, two or three in Iowa, New Hampshire, South Carolina or Nevada. I think for any of the other candidates who are in the front or who are near the front of the pack, if they can’t go one two or three in each of these couple of early states, I think they face a real challenge,” Walker told CNN in an interview aboard his campaign Winnebago traveling across the first caucus state of Iowa.

“I think we can make the case not only here in Iowa, I think we can make a compelling case with a win in New Hampshire, South Carolina and Nevada. We’ve got great crowds in each of those states over the last week,” said Walker, who formally announced his presidential bid last Monday.

Walker has been ahead for months in most Iowa polls, ever since he gave a fiery, well-received speech at the state’s first GOP candidate cattle call this winter.

A significant number of Iowa Republican caucus goers tend to be quite socially conservative, and Walker has been emphasizing conservative positions on everything from same-sex marriage to abortion.

He also flat out changed his position on illegal immigration, going from being open to a path to citizenship, to opposing it.

RELATED: Rick Perry says Boy Scouts ‘better off’ without gay leaders

We read a quote from former Iowa GOP chair Craig Robinson, saying Walker makes former GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney – who changed his position over time on abortion, illegal immigration and other issues – look like a “model of consistency.”

“He’s taking the lines form the opposition.” Walker said,

“I said there should be a path (to citizenship) years ago, when I talked about going forward with legal immigration; I didn’t talk about amnesty,” Walker said. “In fact, I said in that specific interview I opposed the gang of five, the measure that Marco Rubio and others proposed.”

On abortion, when Walker was locked in a tough re-election bid last year in the blue state of Wisconsin, he aired a television ad, speaking straight to camera, in which he talked about the decision being between a woman and her doctor, which is the language of the abortion rights movement.

“I said I’m pro-life but I can only imagine how difficult a decision must be for someone who’s thinking about ending their pregnancy. That’s why I support a law that provides more information to someone to make that decision,” he said. “The law still leaves the decision to the woman and her doctor. As for me, I want to look out for the health and safety of all citizens in my state.”

Walker said millions of dollars of attack ads where aired in his state over the law he signed, and his own advertisement was meant to clarify what the law did.

“Our point was the law that they were attacking us on merely provides more information,” Walker said.