01:39 - Source: CNN
How will US pulling out of deal impact Iranians?
Iranian women chant slogans during an anti-US demonstration outside the former US embassy headquarters in the capital Tehran on May 9, 2018. - Iranians reacted with a mix of sadness, resignation and defiance on May 9 to US President Donald Trump's withdrawal from the nuclear deal, with sharp divisions among officials on how best to respond.
For many, Trump's decision on Tuesday to pull out of the landmark nuclear deal marked the final death knell for the hope created when it was signed in 2015 that Iran might finally escape decades of isolation and US hostility. (Photo by ATTA KENARE / AFP)        (Photo credit should read ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images)
ATTA KENARE/AFP/AFP/Getty Images
Iranian women chant slogans during an anti-US demonstration outside the former US embassy headquarters in the capital Tehran on May 9, 2018. - Iranians reacted with a mix of sadness, resignation and defiance on May 9 to US President Donald Trump's withdrawal from the nuclear deal, with sharp divisions among officials on how best to respond. For many, Trump's decision on Tuesday to pull out of the landmark nuclear deal marked the final death knell for the hope created when it was signed in 2015 that Iran might finally escape decades of isolation and US hostility. (Photo by ATTA KENARE / AFP) (Photo credit should read ATTA KENARE/AFP/Getty Images)
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How will US pulling out of deal impact Iranians?
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Iranian lawmakers burn two pieces of papers representing the U.S. flag and the nuclear deal as they chant slogans against the U.S. at the parliament in Tehran, Iran, Wednesday, May 9, 2018. Iranian lawmakers have set a paper U.S. flag ablaze at parliament after President Donald Trump's nuclear deal pullout, shouting, "Death to America!". President Donald Trump withdrew the U.S. from the deal on Tuesday and restored harsh sanctions against Iran. (AP Photo)
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Iranian lawmakers burn two pieces of papers representing the U.S. flag and the nuclear deal as they chant slogans against the U.S. at the parliament in Tehran, Iran, Wednesday, May 9, 2018. Iranian lawmakers have set a paper U.S. flag ablaze at parliament after President Donald Trump's nuclear deal pullout, shouting, "Death to America!". President Donald Trump withdrew the U.S. from the deal on Tuesday and restored harsh sanctions against Iran. (AP Photo)
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ISFAHAN, IRAN - MARCH 30:  A worker walks inside of an uranium conversion facility March 30, 2005 just outside the city of Isfahan, about 254 miles (410 kilometers), south of capital Tehran, Iran. The cities of Isfahan and Natanz in central Iran are home to the heart of Iran's nuclear program. The facility in Isfahan makes hexaflouride gas, which is then enriched by feeding it into centrifuges at a facility in Natanz, Iran. Iran's President Mohammad Khatami and the head of Iran's Atomic Energy Organisation Gholamreza Aghazadeh is scheduled to visit the facilities. (Photo by Getty Images)
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(CNN) —  

President Barack Obama defended the recently announced landmark nuclear deal with Iran in an interview with The New York Times on Tuesday, his first interview following the deal.

The President said the agreement “was the most definitive path by which Iran will not get a nuclear weapon.”

He reiterated that the United States was keeping its guard up and was not losing sight of Iran’s past behavior.

“This whole system that we built is not based on trust, it’s based on a verifiable mechanism whereby every pathway that they have is shut off,” Obama said.

The President also indicated that discussions on Iran may have softened relations between Russian President Vladimir Putin and the United States.

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“Putin and the Russian government compartmentalized on this in a way that surprised me,” Obama told columnist Tom Friedman of the Iran negotiations.

Russia-U.S relations have grown increasingly tense over violence in Ukraine.

“We would not have achieved this agreement had it not been for Russia’s willingness to stick with us and the other P5 + 1 members in insisting on a strong deal,” Obama said.

The President also said Putin had called him several weeks ago to discuss the state of affairs in Syria. Obama said he didn’t expect to see any dramatic overnight changes, but it was a step in the right direction.

“Part of our goal here is to show that diplomacy can work. It doesn’t work perfectly – it doesn’t give us everything that we want,” the President said. “We can’t control every single event, but what we can do is shape events so that it’s more likely that problems get solved, rather than less likely and that’s the opportunity we have now.”