Story highlights

NEW: Dylann Roof's father bought him a .45-caliber gun for birthday, law enforcement source says

Roof was arrested this year on a drug possession charge and odd behavior at a mall

Local NAACP leader says relatives say shooter spared woman so she could tell what happened

CNN —  

When Dylann Storm Roof turned 21 in April, his father bought him a .45-caliber gun, a senior law enforcement source briefed on the investigation said Thursday.

It’s not known whether that handgun was used when Roof allegedly opened fire Wednesday night at a prayer meeting at Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church in Charleston, South Carolina, killing nine people.

“You rape our women, and you’re taking over our country. And you have to go,” Sylvia Johnson, a cousin of the church’s slain pastor, said the gunman told his victims, according to CNN affiliate WIS. She cited survivors of the shooting.

In the sparse details that have emerged about his life, none would suggest he was capable of such hatred and violence.

Dylann Roof is escorted from the Cleveland County Courthouse in Shelby, North Carolina, on Thursday, June 18.
Chuck Burton/AP
Dylann Roof is escorted from the Cleveland County Courthouse in Shelby, North Carolina, on Thursday, June 18.

Police in his hometown of Columbia – about 120 miles northwest of Charleston – obtained a warrant for his arrest in early March. He had been picked up on drug charges a few days earlier at Columbiana Centre mall, according to a police report.

Workers at two stores told mall security that Roof was acting strangely, asking “out of the ordinary questions” such as the number of sales associates and what time they left the mall, the police report said.

Roof, when confronted, “began speaking very nervously and stated that his parents were pressuring him to get a job,” according to the police report. Roof told the officer he had not picked up any employment applications.

Banned from mall

Roof initially said he wasn’t carrying anything illegal. But he agreed to be searched and an officer found “a small unlabeled white bottle containing multiple orange … square strips” in his jacket, the police report said.

The bottle contained Listerine breath strips, Roof said.

The officer asked again. Roof said the strips were suboxone, which is used to treat opiate addiction, according to the police report. Roof said he got the strips from a friend.

He was arrested on a drug possession charge that day in late February, but it’s unclear why the March 1 arrest warrant was issued.

On April 26, police were again called to Columbiana Centre because Roof, who had been banned from the mall for a year after his drug arrest, had returned, the police report said. The ban was extended to three years.

Roof was arrested that day in late April on a charge of trespassing; his car was turned over to his mother. The disposition of the case is unclear.

One schoolmate of Dylann Roof described him as "kind of wild" but not violent.
Facebook
One schoolmate of Dylann Roof described him as "kind of wild" but not violent.

John Mullins, who attended White Knoll High School with Roof, told CNN on Thursday that the suspect was “kind of wild” but not violent.

“He was … calm,” Mullins said. “That’s why all this is such a shock.”

Mullins said Roof occasionally made racist comments although he had black friends.

“They were just racist slurs in a sense,” he said. “He would say it just as a joke. … I never took it seriously, but now that he shed his other side, so maybe they should have been taken more seriously.”

While the nation rallies behind Charleston, an insight into Roof’s state of mind came from Charleston County Sheriff’s Office spokesman Maj. Eric Watson.

’Quiet, strange, very unsocial’

U.S. Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-South Carolina, said his niece, Emily, was in an eighth-grade English class with Roof.

“He was quiet, strange, very unsocial and everyone thought he was on drugs,” Graham said of the suspect, relaying the description from Emily and his sister, Darline Graham Nordone.

The niece did not recall Roof making statements related to race, Graham said.

“I just think he was one of these whacked-out kids. I don’t think it’s anything broader than that,” said Graham, who is running for president. “It’s about a young man who is obviously twisted.”

On Wednesday night, the white and slightly built gunman was at the historic African-American church for about an hour, attending a meeting with his eventual victims, before the massacre, according to Charleston police Chief Greg Mullen.

Witnesses told investigators the gunman stood up and said he was there “to shoot black people,” a law enforcement official said.

Investigators are looking into whether Roof had links to white supremacist or other hate groups, a law enforcement official said. There’s no indication so far that he was known to law enforcement officials who focus on hate groups.

In an image tweeted by authorities in Berkeley County, South Carolina, Roof is seen wearing a jacket with what appear to be the flags of apartheid-era South Africa and nearby Rhodesia, a former British colony that a white minority ruled until it became independent in 1980 and changed its name to Zimbabwe.

Woman spared by shooter to give account?

A female survivor told family members that the gunman told her he was letting her live to tell everyone else what happened, Dot Scott, president of the local branch of the NAACP, told CNN.

Scott said she had not spoken to the survivor directly but heard this account repeated at least a dozen times as she met with relatives of the victims Wednesday night.

“No one in this community will ever forget this night and … the pain and the hurt this individual has caused this entire community,” Mullen said.

Charleston Mayor Joe Riley said the suspect was “filled with hate and with a deranged mind.”

The man is a “no-good, horrible person,” he said. “Of course we will make sure he pays the price for this horrible act.”

Emanuel AME: A storied church in a historic city

CNN’s Carma Hassan, AnneClaire Stapleton and Deborah Feyerick contributed to this report.