FIFA corruption scandal: What happens next?

Updated 10:51 AM EDT, Thu May 28, 2015
FIFA President Sepp Blatter holds up the name of Qatar during the official announcement of the 2022 World Cup host country on December 2, 2010  at the FIFA headquarters  in Zurich. South Korea, Japan, Australia, Qater and the US were all bidding to host the 2022 World Cup.  AFP PHOTO / PHILIPPE DESMAZES (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE DESMAZES/AFP/Getty Images)
PHILIPPE DESMAZES/AFP/Getty Images
FIFA President Sepp Blatter holds up the name of Qatar during the official announcement of the 2022 World Cup host country on December 2, 2010 at the FIFA headquarters in Zurich. South Korea, Japan, Australia, Qater and the US were all bidding to host the 2022 World Cup. AFP PHOTO / PHILIPPE DESMAZES (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE DESMAZES/AFP/Getty Images)
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Story highlights

European soccer's governing body wants FIFA presidential election postponed

Sepp Blatter, the incumbent for 17 years, is expected to win again

U.S. officials are seeking the extradition of senior FIFA officials

(CNN) —  

The unprecedented twin investigations into FIFA have demonstrated that the opaque organization is subject to the law, not above it.

The Swiss are looking into the controversial 2018 and 2022 World Cup soccer bids, which awarded the games to Russia and Qatar, respectively.

The Americans have outlined a case that sounds like a mafia movie script, with allegations of fraud, racketeering and money laundering over a period of more than 20 years. Several senior FIFA officials are among the defendants facing extradition from Europe, South America and the Caribbean.

“This really is the World Cup of fraud,” said Richard Weber, head of the Internal Revenue Service’s Criminal Investigation division.

Soccer is the most popular sport in the world, with 240 million people regularly playing the game, according to a FIFA estimate. Even in the United States, traditionally considered indifferent to soccer, interest is growing. More Americans watched last year’s U.S.-Portugal World Cup game than watched the 2014 NBA Finals or baseball’s 2013 World Series.

The bombshell announcement of the U.S. indictments was met with the sense that somebody was finally doing something substantial about the corruption allegations that have dogged soccer’s global gatekeeper for years.

“We could make a case that this is the biggest sports bust in history today,” USA Today Sports columnist Christine Brennan told CNN. “This is historic. This is monumental.”

So, what comes next in the investigations?

Here are some of the key questions:

What will happen with the extraditions?

Seven of the 14 defendants wanted by U.S. officials were arrested Wednesday in Zurich, Switzerland, said U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch. The majority of them are contesting extradition to the United States, according to Swiss authorities.

The battle is set to play out in Swiss courts.

“I think there’s a very good chance there will be extradition,” said CNN legal analyst Paul Callan. He noted that Swiss authorities refused to extradite filmmaker Roman Polanski to the United States in 2010, but Polanski’s case is still rumbling on in the Swiss courts.

“There are always outs under these extradition treaties,” Callan said.

Extradition proceedings have also begun in Argentina and Trinidad and Tobago for defendants named in the U.S. indictment.

Are there more arrests in the pipeline?

U.S. law enforcement officials say they’re not done yet.

The indictment unsealed Wednesday “is the beginning of our work, not the end” of an effort to rid global soccer of corruption, said Kelly Currie, acting U.S. attorney for the Eastern District of New York.

The people indicted Wednesday were all linked to soccer in the Americas, but it was unclear where the investigation might focus next and whom it might target.

Swiss authorities, meanwhile, are conducting their own investigation into bidding for the 2018 and 2022 World Cups.

The Swiss aren’t as far along in their investigation as the Americans, but officials said they suspect criminal mismanagement and money laundering took place during the selection process.

Authorities raided FIFA’s head office in Zurich on Wednesday, seizing electronic data and documents. Police plan to question 10 members of FIFA’s executive committee who took part in voting in 2010 on the World Cup bids.

Will the Russia 2018 and Qatar 2022 World Cups be moved?

That still seems unlikely at this point.

FIFA has already announced the results of its own investigation into the bidding process for the two competitions, saying it found no corruption and had no reason to reopen the bidding process. (But Michael Garcia, the American lawyer who led the investigation, said FIFA’s public summary of his report was “incomplete and erroneous.”)

FIFA spokesman Walter De Gregorio said Wednesday that the two World Cups would go ahead as planned despite the Swiss investigation.

Holding the 2022 World Cup in the desert emirate of Qatar has already drawn criticism over the treatment of the migrant workers laboring to build the stadiums for the competition.

Officials have also had to change the dates of the tournament to the winter to avoid Qatar’s sweltering summer heat, raising potential scheduling headaches for other soccer competitions around the world.

Qatar beat the United States and other nations in the bidding for the 2022 World Cup. Australia, one of the other countries to lose out, has been outspoken in its criticism of the tournament dates being switched.

Will FIFA’s big election go ahead this week?

The arrests of FIFA officials in Zurich were rich in dramatic timing. They took place as representatives of the world soccer body’s member associations were congregating in the city ahead of the organization’s annual congress Friday.