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Manning is serving a 35-year sentence for leaking thousands of classified documents

She says she will be using a voice phone to dictate her tweets

CNN —  

The U.S. Army has agreed to provide hormone therapy for Chelsea Manning, the soldier serving a 35-year prison sentence for leaking a huge trove of classified documents.

Manning, who is serving a 35-year prison sentence for leaking thousands of classified documents, appears to have joined Twitter this week.

The prisoner formerly known as Bradley Manning, and once held to be male, said in August 2013, the day after her court sentencing, that she is female. Just over a year later, it emerged that she had filed a lawsuit in federal court claiming she “has been denied access to medically necessary treatment” for her gender disorder.

She is not allowed Internet access in prison, according to The Guardian.

“It will be hard, but I don’t want this Twitter feed to be a one-way street/conversation,” Manning posted to her nearly 26,000-plus followers.

Manning was sentenced in 2013, and in August of that year, she said she wanted to transition to a female.

The commandant of the Fort Leavenworth Disciplinary Barracks in Kansas, where Manning is serving her sentence, issued a memo on February 5 authorizing the addition of hormone therapy to Manning’s treatment, USA Today reported Thursday.

Manning said she was diagnosed in 2010 with gender dysphoria, which her lawyers describe as “the medical diagnosis given to individuals whose gender identity – their innate sense of being male or female – differs from the sex they were assigned at birth, causing clinically significant distress.”

A Kansas judge in April granted the former Army intelligence analyst’s request to formally be known as Chelsea Elizabeth Manning.

She was convicted last year of stealing and disseminating 750,000 pages of documents and videos to WikiLeaks in what has been described as the largest leak of classified material in U.S. history. Manning was found guilty of 20 of the 22 charges against her, including violations of the U.S. Espionage Act.

She was found guilty of 20 of the 22 charges, including violations of the U.S. Espionage Act.

Manning has written opinion pieces for The New York Times and The Guardian from prison.