5 things to know for your New Day -- Tuesday, March 24

(CNN)A report says Israel spied on US-Iran nuclear talks. Police say there's no "substantive basis" to support UVA rape story. And firing squads are back in vogue again in Utah.

It's Tuesday, and here are the 5 things to know for your New Day.

NUCLEAR TALKS

Lobbying against deal: Israel spied on closed-door talks over Iran's nuclear program involving the United States and other world powers to help it argue against a potential deal, according to the Wall Street Journal. The Israeli government's use of the information it gleaned -- sharing it with U.S. lawmakers and others to undercut support for a deal -- was what really angered the White House, the Journal reported, citing current and former U.S. officials

    UVA RAPE ALLEGATION

    No 'substantive basis': That was the conclusion yesterday of police in Charlottesville, Virginia, after investigators dug into a story, published by Rolling Stone last year, of a University of Virginia student's claim that she was raped at a fraternity house. Police Chief Tim Longo noted that while police found no evidence to support her account, it doesn't mean that "something terrible didn't happen" to her. Longo welcomed any new information about the case that may be out there. As for Rolling Stone, its story is being reviewed by Columbia University. That will be published early next month.
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    AIRPORT SECURITY

    Armed unit?: TSA officers at the airport aren't armed. After a machete attack Friday night at a security checkpoint at New Orleans' airport, TSA's union wants that to change.The union seeks the creation of a new armed unit at the nation's airports authorized to use deadly force. In the machete attack, a man stormed a checkpoint waving a machete and spraying wasp repellent (at least one TSA officer was injured). The man was shot by a sheriff's deputy. Union president J. David Cox said TSA employees are vulnerable because they're the first people passengers come in contact with at the airport and the current system is too dependent on local police for protection.
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    ROBERT DURST

    No bail: It's no big surprise that a judge denied bail yesterday for murder suspect Robert Durst. The last time he faced a murder charge and was out on bail -- in 2001 -- he fled to Pennsylvania. During the court proceedings, new details were revealed about how Durst, a millionaire real estate heir, was arrested. Federal agents tracked his cell phone and arrested him after he called his voice mail from a Marriott hotel in New Orleans. A UPS tracking number in his possession when he was arrested led to agents intercepting a package which contained clothing and $100,000 in cash. Next up in the case is a preliminary hearing set for April 2.
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    FIRING SQUADS

    OK in Utah: Utah can once again use firing squads to execute prisoners. Gov. Gary R. Herbert signed legislation yesterday that allows firing squads for executions if the drugs used in lethal injections can't be found. Lethal injection remains the primary execution method in the state. The last execution by firing squad was in 2010, which was also the most recent execution in Utah. A Utah firing squad also executed Gary Gilmore in 1977, the first death by capital punishment after the U.S. Supreme Court reinstated the death penalty the prior year.