Boy Scouts of America's responses to CNN

(CNN)Below are the full statements from the Boy Scouts of America to CNN.

Statement 1, emailed May 9, 2014:

"The abuse of anyone is deplorable and is absolutely counter to everything for which the Boy Scouts of America stand. There have been instances where people misused their positions in Scouting to abuse children, and in certain cases, our response to these incidents and our efforts to protect youth were plainly insufficient, inappropriate, or wrong. Where those involved in Scouting failed to protect, or worse, inflicted harm on children, we extend our deepest apologies to victims and their families.
"We believe even one instance of abuse is too many and fully recognize the responsibility we have when parents entrust the development and safety of their children to Scouting. This is why BSA policies have consistently evolved, along with increased knowledge and best practices. The BSA is committed to ongoing enhancement.
    "While it is difficult to understand or explain individuals' actions from decades ago, nothing is more important to Scouting than the safety of our youth members. The BSA regularly consults with experts from law enforcement, child safety, psychology, and other disciplines to ensure its efforts consistently evolve along with the ever-changing awareness of the dangers and challenges facing youth. "
    Also, here are some additional points that provide information to the topics you shared. If you have any specific questions, we're happy to answer them as well.
    • This individual resigned as Camp Director at Camp Horseshoe in 1992 and his membership was revoked for reasons unrelated to child abuse. When the individual reapplied for membership in 1995, a thorough review was conducted by many community and Scouting leaders, and his application to be an adult volunteer leader was accepted. Several years later, when he was first accused of child abuse in 1999, he was permanently removed from the Scouting program.
    • Recognizing that our commitment to youth protection requires sustained vigilance, the BSA continues to develop and enhance efforts to protect youth. Through this program, the BSA regularly consults with experts from law enforcement, child safety, psychology, and other disciplines to ensure its efforts consistently evolve along with the ever-changing awareness of the dangers and challenges facing youth.
    • To create the most secure environment possible for our youth members, today the BSA takes a multi-layered approach to youth protection: (1) local selection of adult volunteers with the support of the national organization, (2) education and training, and (3) clear policies such as no "one on one" activities, and immediate reporting of any concerns.
    • These multi-tiered policies and procedures call for any good faith suspicion of abuse to result in the immediate revocation of membership and the BSA has many barriers in place to prevent those who are ineligible to serve as Scout leaders from joining or rejoining Scouts.
    • This means that all persons involved in Scouting shall report to local authorities any good faith suspicion or belief that any child is or has been physically or sexually abused, physically or emotionally neglected, exposed to any form of violence or threat, exposed to any form of sexual exploitation including the possession, manufacture, or distribution of child pornography, online solicitation, enticement, or showing of obscene material. No person may abdicate this reporting responsibility to any other person. The Scout Executive must be notified of this report, or of any violation of BSA's Youth Protection policies, so he or she may take appropriate action for the safety of our Scouts, make appropriate notifications, and follow-up with investigating agencies.
    Last, we do not discuss pending or active litigation or the number of cases.
    I hope this information is helpful and please let me know if I can answer additional questions or provide further clarification.
    Thank you,
    Deron
    Deron Smith | Director
    BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA Communications

    Statement 2, emailed September 24, 2014:

    The National Council, Boy Scouts of America is pleased that the Novak case has been resolved. While we can¹t comment on the specifics related to this agreement, any instance of child victimization or abuse is intolerable and unacceptable.
    The Boy Scouts of America take the protection of youth very seriously, which is why we have continuously enhanced our multi-tiered policies and procedures. The BSA's comprehensive youth protection program includes education, chartered organization leader selection procedures, criminal background and other checks, barriers to abuse and prompt mandatory reporting.
    There have been instances where people misused their positions in Scouting to abuse children, and in certain cases, our response to these incidents and our efforts to protect youth were plainly insufficient, inappropriate, or wrong. We extend our deepest apologies to victims and their families. We fully recognize the responsibility we have when parents entrust the development and safety of their children to Scouting, which is why BSA policies have consistently evolved along with increased knowledge and best practices, and the BSA is committed to ongoing enhancement.
    Additionally, for more than 100 years, we have had a proud partnership with The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. The Church was the Boy Scouts of America's first sponsor in 1913, and a century later remains dedicated to the Scouting movement. We thank the Church for their commitment to our mission, their immeasurable impact they have had on our nation's youth, and look forward to our ongoing partnership.
    Deron Smith | Director
    BOY SCOUTS OF AMERICA Communications