John Boehner gets a little help from his friends

House passes Homeland Security funding bill
House passes Homeland Security funding bill

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    House passes Homeland Security funding bill

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House passes Homeland Security funding bill 02:47

Washington (CNN)Last Friday, House Speaker John Boehner was humiliated.

He faced a revolt from his own members, risked a shutdown of the Department of the Homeland Security and readied himself for a possible coup attempt.
Just days later, the drama over the speaker's grip on the gavel has faded.
While a sizeable group of those on the right flank in the House are still deeply unhappy the body failed to block President Barack Obama's executive actions on immigration, there isn't any serious effort to try to oust Boehner for now.
    Boehner's own allies set off alarm bells last week, and warned the speaker his job could be in jeopardy if he gave in to Democrats' demands to pass a so-called '"clean" DHS funding bill that didn't include provisions designed to stop the administration's immigration policies.
    "On Friday night the vote at that point was not simply about Homeland Security appropriations bill, but about this half-baked coup attempt and that became more than an annoyance to a number of us," Pennsylvania Rep. Charlie Dent, a supporter of Boehner's, told CNN.
    Another House Republican close to Boehner said there was serious concern about whether the speaker would be challenged.
    But by alerting colleagues about a potential plot, the speaker's supporters effectively "smoked out" the group of members who were considering a plot to force a change in leadership. This Republican argued that those contemplating a move -- members mostly from the staunchly conservative House Freedom Caucus, a group created expressly to move House GOP leaders to the right -- were forced to answer questions about their end game.
    "They had no plan and had no alternative strategy" to what to do next to fight the President on immigration, this Republican said.
    It became apparent they weren't ready to pull the trigger to try to take down the speaker and realized if they did the effort would fail. The main problem for the group was that they had no candidate to replace Boehner. While they were able to embarrass him by defeating his three week DHS funding bill, they didn't have an ability to force him out.
    Ohio Republican Rep. Jim Jordan, the chair of the Freedom Caucus, pressed by CNN's Dana Bash on Sunday about a possible coup, waved it off, saying, "That's not going to happen."
    South Carolina GOP Rep. Mick Mulvaney, a founding member of the Freedom Caucus, told reporters on Tuesday he was never part of any discussion to oust Boehner, and he argued the media was driving the discussion.
    "Everybody knows it would take Democrat cooperation to do that, which is not going to happen. So I think that any discussion about that is just not premature, I think it's irrelevant," Mulvaney told reporters Tuesday.
    When the speaker announced in a private meeting for all Republican House members Tuesday morning he was reversing course and would allow a vote on a clean funding bill without any immigration measures, he asked his members if anyone had questions. Not one member stood up or complained.
    Boehner explained he had run out of options and it was time to move on to other Republican priorities.
    Leaving the meeting, GOP Rep. Scott Garrett of New Jersey, a critic of the leadership's plan, said he opposed the clean funding bill, but was resigned it would pass.
    "We are just playing out the leadership plan from December," Garrett said, referring to a spending bill that Congress passed last year that postponed the fight over the President's immigration policies to the debate on the DHS spending bill.
    Virginia Republican Rep. Dave Brat was more critical.
    "I would have liked to have seen a fight against the constitutional piece, instead of against of our own members," he said.
    Another member of the Freedom Caucus, Louisiana Rep. John Fleming, pointed out that an outside Republican group with ties to Boehner, the American Action Network, unveiled a round of television ads aimed at several members of the group on Tuesday, and cited the news as evidence the group wielded some influence.
    The ads featured images of terrorist wielding guns and criticized these Republicans, saying their opposition to the funding bill risked national security.
    Fleming, who wasn't among those targeted by the group, said his colleagues who were called out by the group were "not really worried about it."
    But Mulvaney said the ads showed the GOP leaders had the wrong strategy, and should have been spending time ramping up pressure on those Senate Democrats who agreed that the president had overstepped his authority by going around Congress on immigration.
    "American Action Network should be spending their money to try and get those Democrats to change the votes, not beating up on Republicans in the House," Mulvaney said.
    The House is scheduled for a week-long recess next week, giving Republicans time to reflect on the latest tumult.
    On the horizon Boehner faces a slew of a controversial items. He'll need to wrangle with fellow Republicans again to get things like a GOP budget and a measure to raise the nation's debt limit through the House.
    The deep divisions are likely to linger and flare up again soon, so Boehner's reprieve from the internal drama is likely to be short-lived.