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Story highlights

NEW: The trials of Aaron Hernandez and Dzhokhar Tsarnaev are delayed

Schools will be closed Monday and Tuesday in some areas, including Boston

Boston has already set a record for the snowiest seven-day period in history

(CNN) —  

Sorry, Northeast. It’s not over yet.

Another winter storm barreling toward some parts of the region Sunday is expected to pile on to already record snowfalls.

The two other storms that hit the Northeast in the past two weeks closed airports, canceled classes and created mountains of snow along cleared roadways.

Schools in parts of the Northeast, including Boston, will be closed Monday and Tuesday.

“Snow accumulations of 10 to 20 inches, possibly up to 24 inches in parts of central and northeast Massachusetts,” the National Weather Service said.

It described it as a “long duration snow event” that could last until Monday night. Warnings are in place through early Tuesday morning.

Upstate New York could see 9 to 18 inches of snow through Monday night, the National Weather Service said.

Flurries and light snow fell in Boston on Saturday night, and heavy snow was expected Sunday night through Monday.

“At this time, our concern is not just about the snow that has begun to fall. It’s about the cumulative impact of this storm coming on the heels of the others,” Massachusetts Gov. Charlie Baker told reporters Sunday.

Wind gusts could be up to 35 mph, bringing poor visibility and possible whiteout conditions, said CNN meteorologist Michael Guy.

In what appears to be a common theme these days, Boston Mayor Marty Walsh urged people to stay indoors and off the roads.

“We need residents to take extra precautions as we prepare for another storm and extremely low temperatures,” he said in a statement.

The weather forced big Massachusetts trials to be delayed.

The murder trial of former New England Patriots star Aaron Hernandez has been pushed back to Wednesday, and jury selection in the trial of Boston bombing suspect Dzhokhar Tsarnaev was similarly delayed.

Two storms have hit the Northeast in the past two weeks, closing airports, canceling classes and creating piles of snow along cleared roadways.

“I’m tired of it,” said Boston University freshman Cameron Barkan, who has missed three days of class because of the storms. “I usually like snow, but this is just a little much.”

Boston has set a record for the snowiest seven-day period in history, with over 40 inches, the National Weather Service said. The city is way past its average annual snowfall of 47 inches.

Winter weather will keep its grip on the region late in the week, with temperatures dropping to the teens again by Friday, Guy said.

Track the storm

CNN’s Susanna Capelouto, Josh Levs and Kristina Sgueglia contributed to this report.