Hillary Clinton finds a campaign message in personal speech

Story highlights

  • Hillary Clinton, who regularly pitches female voters, got personal in her plea on Tuesday.
  • The personal remarks resembled a message Clinton could use should she run for president.
  • "You have the same right to the American dream that I did," Clinton said Americans should be able to tell children
  • This was Clinton's second trip to Colorado in a week.
Hillary Clinton used her Tuesday appearance in Colorado, where experts see the female vote deciding a number of statewide races, to court women with a personal message about her life and her hopes for the future.
Clinton usually targets women voters in her appearances. But in Colorado, the former secretary of state and likely presidential candidate in 2016, spoke about how fortunate she felt to be born in America and the message she hopes to be able to leave with children.
The personal remarks, while focused on turning out voters for Democrats Mark Udall, John Hickenlooper and Andrew Romanoff, sounds a great deal like a presidential candidate and resembled a message Clinton could use should she run for president.
"I have had a great set of experiences. I have been very fortunate in my life, but the most fortunate thing besides the parents to whom I was born, is that I was born in America," Clinton said. "I, from the moment of my birth, was blessed because of that. And I grew up believing with all my heart that if I worked hard, if I did was I was supposed to do, go to school, get an education, that I would have opportunities that were never available to my mother."
Clinton added, "Indeed that came true for me. I don't want that ever to be lost. I want everyone in this room to be able to look at any baby, any child and truthfully say, 'You have the same right to the American dream that I did.'"
This was Clinton's second trip to Colorado in a week. She spent a few hours with Udall last week at a private fundraiser and at a local coffee shop and market to meet voters.
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Udall is in a tight race with Republican Rep. Cory Gardner, who some polls have slightly ahead.
"The only poll that counts is that poll on election day," Udall said, warming up the crowd for Clinton by using a tried-and-true campaign cliche.
Democrats in the state and nationally see Clinton as someone who can turn out women in Colorado, a key demographic that some experts see the election turning on.
"This election is important to everybody, but it is especially important to the women of Colorado," Clinton said, touching upon a woman's right to choose, personhood laws and availability of birth control - all topics the race between Udall and Gardner have focused on.
"Women's rights here at home and around the world are clearly at risk," Clinton said, arguing those rights "are like the canaries in the mine."
Although Clinton was there to endorse Democrats and increase excitement, her presidential aspirations weren't far from the minds of many.
Before Clinton went on, Romanoff tried to pep up the crowd by asking, "Are you ready to hear from the next president of the United States?"
Even Udall got into the hinting at 2016 action when he said, "I think we hope she [Hillary Clinton] is going to come back over the next few years."