Luxy, a dating app for Android and iOS devices, promises to "weed out low-income prospects" for its well-to-do users.

Story highlights

Luxy is a dating app that targets rich people

Creators claim average man on site makes $200,000 a year

Company's CEO won't identify himself

CNN —  

If you’re looking to hook up via your smartphone, and aren’t overly concerned about looking like a snob while doing so, Luxy may be the app for you.

Billing itself as “Tinder, minus the riff-raff,” the app, launched this month for Android and in May for Apple devices, is designed to play matchmaker for the rich and beautiful – all others be damned.

“With the rise of high-speed digital dating, it’s about time somebody introduced a filter to weed out low-income prospects by neighborhood,” said the CEO of Luxy in a media release.

Who is that CEO? Good question. A Luxy spokesman on Tuesday would only identify him as “Tim T.”

(It is worth noting, perhaps, that the only written review of the app in the Google Play store on Tuesday was a 5-star entry by a user with the screen name “Tim T.”)

Spokesman Darren Shuster said the decision to keep “Tim’s” identity private is likely due to negative feedback the app has received.

Luxy claims that the average income of male users is $200,000. Shuster said, via email, that the team behind the app is working on an income-verification system but, in the meantime, is looking to the community to police itself.

“If you show up in a 20-year-old VW Bug, and request to meet at McDonald’s, you won’t last very long on LUXY,” he said. “Look, these members drive the best cars, hang out at the fanciest hotels, live in the biggest houses, wear the best clothes. It doesn’t take long to weed out those who belong on a different kind of dating site.”

Among the app’s current users are “CEOs, professional athletes, doctors, lawyers, investors, entrepreneurs, beauty queens, fitness models and Hollywood celebrities,” according to the media release.

The app has only been downloaded between 10 and 50 times, according to Google Play. Rich people must all have iPhones (Apple doesn’t provide download numbers).

So, how does the app decide which well-heeled hottie is right for you? By asking which products you like to conspicuously consume, of course.

Users are asked to submit “their five favorite luxury style brands” for consideration. Presumably, that will help track down the Mercedes-Prada-Gucci-Louboutin-Dom Perignon enthusiast you’ll want to spend the rest of your life with.

Users may then scroll through profiles of others, tapping the ones they like and swiping away those that don’t meet their standards. If two users “like” each other, the app introduces them and sets up a chat.