Sochi 2014 begins with teams, classical music and a flying girl

Updated 4:56 PM EST, Wed February 12, 2014

Story highlights

NEW: Suspect reportedly in custody in Turkey after jet bomb threat, desire to fly to Sochi

Opening began with a girl, rigged with wires, flying over floats depicting Russian landscapes

Russian President Vladimir Putin attended

Putin pushed for the International Olympic Committee to hold the Games in the nation

(CNN) —  

With lights, floats and flying, Russia kicked off the opening ceremony in Sochi as the world turns its attention to the costliest Olympic Games in history.

Spectators from all over the world watched the introduction of athletes that marked the official start of the Winter Olympics.

Light shows and music, lots of it, filled the air, starting at exactly 8:14 p.m. local time, or 20:14 in military time.

“Most of the ceremony focuses heavily on Russian classical music,” said Konstantin Ernst, the main creative producer of the ceremony.

“Unfortunately, unlike London, we cannot boast a plethora of famous world-known pop performers. This is why we are now focusing on what Russia is best known for musically around the world; namely, classical music.”

The celebration opened with a dream sequence of a little girl, who imagined all of the letters in the Russian alphabet, each letter recalling a Russian writer, artist or landmark.

Then the girl, rigged with wires, flew into the air and floated dreamlike over floats that depicted Russian landscapes.

The athletes followed.

After all the anxiety about a terror strike, controversy over gay rights and ridicule over poor preparations, the Winter Olympics commenced smoothly enough, as qualification events were held in the men’s and women’s slopestyle, women’s moguls and team figure skating.

On the eve of that ceremony, Dmitry Chernyshenko, head of the Games, promised Sochi will be “the safest place on Earth during the Olympics.”

Thursday’s developments involved more than just sports.

The opening ceremony was the only event scheduled for the day.

About 40,000 people watched from the stands at Fisht Olympic Stadium in Sochi.

Russian classical music star Anna Netrebko performed the Olympic anthem.

A day before, high excitement marked qualification events in the men’s and women’s slopestyle, women’s moguls and team figure skating.

SECURITY

Russia has drafted some 37,000 police and security officers to handle security in Sochi. But that’s not been enough to assuage everyone’s fears.

Turkish hijacking: A Turkish jetliner signaled a hijacking and landed in Istanbul on Friday after a passenger said a bomb was on board and told crew members to take the plane to Sochi, Turkish officials said. A suspect is reportedly in custody, and authorities are searching the plane for explosives.

Toothpaste terror: A day after the United States warned of how explosive materials could be concealed in toothpaste or cosmetic tubes, its government Thursday temporarily banned all liquids, gels, aerosols and powders in carry-on luggage on flights between the United States and Russia.

U.S. partnership: Meanwhile, U.S. authorities are working with the Russians and other countries to try to disrupt several possible threats, including the toothpaste tube concern, a U.S. intelligence source said Thursday.

The threats vary in credibility, and the biggest one traces to the group Imarat Kavkaz in Russia, which has publicly said its followers will try to disrupt the games, the official said.

Meanwhile, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-California, told CNN she’s read the threat reports about the Olympics. “The threat stream is credible, I think it’s real,” she said.

Private protection: The U.S. ski and snowboarding team has hired a private security firm, Global Rescue, to provide protection. It’s not clear how much the firm could do in the event of a major incident, when Russian forces will be in charge, but it has been gathering intelligence on the ground and will provide an extra layer of protection as athletes travel around.

Ships for safety: Meanwhile, two U.S. Navy ships have steamed into the Black Sea, where they will be ready to help if any mass evacuation of U.S. citizens is needed. U.S. security officials have also been working with their Russian counterparts on how to keep the Games safe against the backdrop of a regional separatist movement that has used terrorism in the past and has threatened to use it during Sochi’s Olympic Games.

Targets of threats: Americans are not the only ones who are jittery. Austria said this week that two of its female athletes had been the target of specific threats. Austrian media reported an anonymous letter was sent warning Alpine skier Bernadette Schild and skeleton racer Janine Flock they could be kidnapped.