Asia

Meet Afghan refugees

Updated 8:29 AM ET, Wed January 29, 2014
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Khalzarin Zirgul, 6 and Zaman, 3 months -- For more than three decades, Pakistan has been home to one of the world's largest refugee communities. AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen
Madina Juma'a, 4 -- Associated Press chief photographer in Pakistan, Muhammed Muheisen, photographed Afghan children in a slum on the outskirts of Islamabad. AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen
laiba Hazrat, 6 -- The award-winning photographer captured the toll the conflict had on very young Afghan refugees. AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen
Waheed Wazir, 6 -- "Their tough life makes them look older and react as elderly people," Muheisen told Time magazine. AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen
Gul Bibi Shamra, 3 -- "Their innocence is right there in their eyes," Muheisen said. AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen
Safia Mourad, 4 -- Hundreds of thousands of Afghans have fled the repeated wars and fighting their country has undergone to settle in Pakistan. AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen
Gullakhta Nawab, 6 -- Since the 2002, some 3.8 million Afghans have returned to their home country, according to the U.N.'s refugee agency. AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen
Zarlakhta Nawab, 6 -- Nearly 1.6 million registered Afghan refugees remain in Pakistan, with another million living here illegally, the U.N. estimates. AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen
Robina Haseeb, 5 -- "I wanted to photograph them to show what I see every time I step in those slums," Muheisen said. AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen
Naseebah Zarghoul, 6 -- Despite feeling alienated in Pakistan, many refugees say they wouldn't take the risk of returning to Afghanistan. AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen
Basmina, 3 -- Civilian casualties in Afghanistan increased by a quarter in 2013, the United Nations said. AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen
Akhtar Babrek, 13 -- Nearly three-quarters of all civilian casualties in 2013 resulted from actions by anti-government groups, notably the Taliban, the U.N. report found. AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen
Hayat Khan, 8 -- Although Pakistan renewed its program of providing protection and safety for over 1.6 million registered Afghan refugees last year, the conditions in refugees camps are not good. AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen
Noorkhan Zahir, 6 -- The UNHCR plans to continue with its voluntary repatriation program this year. AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen
Ibraheem Rahees, 8 -- Estimated 150,000 refugees should be able to return to Afghanistan this year. AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen
Hazrat Babir , 7 -- The exodus of Afghans from their homeland after the occupation by the Soviet Union id 1979 made history as the largest refugee crisis in the world, the U.N. says. AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen
Abdulrahman Bahadir, 13 -- Afghans still represent the largest group of refugees in the world, the agency says. AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen
Allam Ahmad, 6 -- The UN Refugee Agency estimates that in June 2013, there were 11.1 million refugees around the world. AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen
Shahzada Saleem, 15 and Satara, two months -- For more than three decades, Pakistan has been home to one of the world's largest refugee communities: hundreds of thousands of Afghans who have fled the repeated wars and fighting their country has undergone. Since the 2002 U.S.-led invasion of Afghanistan, some 3.8 million Afghans have returned to their home country, according to the U.N.'s refugee agency. AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen
Awal Gul, 12 -- Most Afghan refugees fled their homes due to violence and persecution at various times since 1979. AP Photo/Muhammed Muheisen