Franklin McCain -- of 'Greensboro Four,' who defied whites-only barrier -- dies

Franklin McCain sits at a lunch counter at a  and three fellow African-American college students made history just by sitting down at a Woolworth's lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina, and waiting.

Story highlights

  • Franklin McCain, who died Thursday, was one of the "Greensboro Four"
  • In 1960, four black students defied segregation by sitting at a whites-only lunch counter
  • The act spawned sit-ins elsewhere and was hailed as a major desegregation effort
  • "We wanted to be included in the round table of humanity," said another of the four
Five decades ago, Franklin McCain and three fellow African-American college students made history just by sitting down at a Woolworth's lunch counter in Greensboro, North Carolina, and waiting.
And waiting.
And waiting -- for service that never came that day at the whites-only counter.
The four came back the next day. And the next.
The "Greensboro Four," as they came to be known, drew national attention with their peaceful demonstration in the winter of 1960.
Within three days of their first attempt to simply sit and eat, more than 300 students, including whites, were taking part in what was being called "a sit-in" in Greensboro.