Iraq Prison Abuse Scandal Fast Facts

Detainees stand in the Abu Ghraib prison yard while waiting to be released on June 27, 2006, in Baghdad, Iraq.

(CNN)Here's some background information about the Abu Ghraib prisoner abuse scandal which took place during the Iraq war.

Facts:
Abu Ghraib prison was a US Army detention center for captured Iraqis from 2003 to 2006. An investigation into the treatment of detainees at the prison was prompted by the discovery of graphic photos depicting guards abusing detainees in 2003.
The facility was located 20 miles west of Baghdad on 280 acres.
At the height of the scandal, the prison held as many as 3,800 detainees.
    Most of the detainees lived in tents in the prison yards.
    The abuses took place inside the prison in cell blocks 1A and 1B.
    Eleven US soldiers were convicted of crimes relating to the Abu Ghraib scandal. Seven of those were from Maryland-based 372nd Military Police Company. A number of other service members were not charged but reprimanded.
    Timeline:
    November 2003 - A detainee dies during an interrogation at Abu Ghraib.
    January 2004 - Spc. Joseph M. Darby discovers photos on a CD-ROM of Iraqi prisoners being abused. He reports the abuse to superiors, prompting an investigation.
    April 4, 2004 - Maj. Gen. Antonio Taguba releases his report to Lt. Gen. Ricardo Sanchez about misconduct in the 800th Military Police Brigade.
    April 28, 2004 - "60 Minutes II" broadcasts graphic photos of Iraqi detainees being humiliated and tortured.
    April 30, 2004 - The New Yorker publishes an article by Seymour Hersh reporting details in the Taguba report on the abuses at Abu Ghraib.
    April 30, 2004 - Taguba's report detailing his investigation of the 800th Military Police Brigade is released.
    Taguba's report stated that the following abuses happened in this incident:
    - Punching, slapping, and kicking detainees; jumping on their naked feet.
    - Videotaping and photographing naked male and female detainees.
    - Forcibly arranging detainees in various sexually explicit positions for photographing.
    - Forcing detainees to remove their clothing and keeping them naked for several days at a time.
    - Forcing naked male detainees to wear women's underwear.
    - Forcing groups of male detainees to masturbate themselves while being photographed and videotaped.
    - Arranging naked male detainees in a pile and then jumping on them.
    - Positioning a naked detainee on a box, with a sandbag on his head, and attaching wires to his fingers, toes, and penis to simulate electric torture.
    - Writing "I am a Rapest (sic)" on the leg of a detainee accused of rape, and then photographing him naked.
    - Placing a dog chain or strap around a naked detainee's neck and having a female soldier pose for a picture.
    - A male MP guard having sex with a female detainee.
    - Using military working dogs (without muzzles) to intimidate and frighten detainees, and in at least one case biting and severely injuring a detainee.
    - Taking photographs of dead Iraqi detainees.
    May 4, 2004 - Gen. George W. Casey Jr. announces that in the past 16 months the US Army has conducted more than 30 criminal investigations into misconduct by US captors during both Operation Iraqi Freedom and Operation Enduring Freedom.
    May 5, 2004 - US President George W. Bush records interviews with Al Arabiya and US-sponsored Al-Hurra networks expressing his disgust with the mistreatment of Iraqi detainees.
    May 6, 2004 - During a joint news conference with King Abdullah II of Jordan, Bush expresses remorse "f