Halloween candy for orangutans

Story highlights

  • John Sutter: Halloween candy is contributing to orangutan habitat destruction
  • Rain forest is cleared for palm oil plantations; the oil is used in many snack foods
  • Sutter: El Paso Zoo calls for a boycott of all palm oil products; others raise awareness
  • An app from the zoo scans products and tells consumers whether to buy candy
When Americans hand out Halloween candy next week they may inadvertently be contributing to the destruction of orangutan habitat thousands of miles away.
But don't feel guilty. Instead, do something about it.
Many types of Halloween candy -- and lots of other packaged foods in the United States -- contain palm oil, much of which is farmed in Malaysia and Indonesia, where orangutans live. Wild forests that support the endangered orangutan are being chopped down and burned to grow geometric rows of trees that ultimately produce oil.
The use of palm oil in processed foods is way, way up in part because it doesn't contain trans fat, which the United States says must be labeled on food packaging because of its unhealthiness. The U.S. imports about 10 times as much palm oil now as it did in the mid-1990s. It's not that the oil is evil. It's that production methods need to change.
"Orangutans are just so compelling," said Laurel Sutherlin, a spokesman for the Rainforest Action Network, which recently released a report called "Conflict Palm Oil." The report links irresponsible palm oil production to modern slavery and climate change -- in addition to the destruction of orangutan habitat.
John D. Sutter
"They're as closely related to us as chimpanzees. They, in a very, very real way, are being threatened with extinction, and palm oil is the single biggest threat they face."
One way to help is simply to tell snack food and candy companies that you care about orangutans and about the rain forest in southeast Asia.
The Rainforest Action Network has made that easy. The group, which recently got some buzz on blogs for posting a staged video of an orangutan called Strawberry (not her real name) communicating in sign language and via video chat with a hearing-impaired girl, has started an online campaign called "Last Stand of the Orangutan."
The group is asking people to upload photos of their palms (gotta love a homonym) to a website. It's hoping to collect 60,600 images -- or one human hand for every orangutan in the wild. They're going to deliver the images