Entertainment

Bloody good: Hollywood's most violent films

Updated 4:44 PM ET, Sun January 4, 2015
Share
16 violent movies16 violent movies
1 of 20
Sure, there were earlier "Rambo" movies, but Sylvester Stallone was the quintessential killing machine in the 2008 version as he attempted to rescue aid workers in Myanmar. from Millennium Films
"Kick Ass 2" hits theaters this week. In light of the Sandy Hook massacre, one of the movie's stars, Jim Carrey, recently distanced himself from the film and what he calls "that level of violence." But when it comes to graphic content, Hollywood has never been shy about being bloody. Universal Pictures
The West was pretty wild in 1969's "The Wild Bunch," directed by Sam Peckinpah and starring William Holden and Ernest Borgnine as aging outlaws out to make a score. Plenty of bullets flew before it was all said and done. from Warner Bros.-Seven Arts
Director Stanley Kubrick's 1971 film adaptation of the novel "A Clockwork Orange," about a sociopath and his gang, offered up plenty of violent scenes ranging from beatings to rape. The film was controversial following its release. And in 2010, nearly 40 years later, it still ranked on Time magazine's list of the "Top 10 Ridiculously Violent Movies." From Warner Bros.
When "Death Wish" was released in 1974, it caused quite a stir with its vigilante justice. Charles Bronson stars as a man who wantonly kills criminals after his wife is murdered by a group of thugs. From Paramount Pictures
Remakes have tried to recapture the bloody mess of "The Texas Chainsaw Massacre" from 1974, but the original remains a classic and launched the character of Leatherface into the bloody hall of fame. From Vortex
1989's "Bloodfist" followed a kickboxer out to avenge his brother's death. Plenty of folks get messed up along the way. from Concorde Films
The violent death of mobster Bill Batts kicked off "Goodfellas," and the body count just rose from there. The 1990 film was critically acclaimed and earned co-star Joe Pesci an Academy Award for best supporting actor. from Warner Bros.
Arnold Schwarzenegger had a lot of dreams in 1990's "Total Recall," but the violence was very real as he headed to Mars to figure out his memories. Lionsgate Publicity
No list would be complete without a Quentin Tarantino film (actually several, but more on that later). "Reservoir Dogs" had moviegoers in 1992 grabbing hold of their ears and wincing. from Miramax Films
This time around, Tarantino let the girls have some fun. In 2003's "Kill Bill Volume 1," Uma Thurman wreaks havoc and dices enemies as the Bride. from Miramax Films
The 2004 sequel, "Kill Bill Volume 2," had the tag line "The Bride is back for the final cut." Enough said. from Miramax Films
Some viewers of 2004's "Saw" had trouble not losing the contents of their stomachs with this NC-17 movie about a serial killer who forces his victims to play a deadly game. from Lionsgate
Adapted from a comic book series, 2005's "Sin City" was dark and bloody as it followed the tale of four characters dealing with crime and corruption. from Dimension Films
Musician Rob Zombie directed the 2005 movie "The Devil's Rejects," about a family of serial killers on the run. from Lionsgate
Amsterdam serves as the bloody backdrop of 2005's "Hostel," in which a group of travelers get more than they bargained for. from Screen Gems
Viggo Mortensen's character loses his nice calm life after he defends his diner and its customers from would-be robbers in 2005's "A History of Violence." from New Line Cinema
Javier Bardem scared the mess out of audiences as an evil killer in the 2007 film "No Country for Old Men," which was no movie for the faint of heart. from Miramax Films
Tarantino used France during World War II as the setting for much violence in 2009's "Inglourious Basterds." from Universal Pictures International
"Inglourious Basterds" standout Christoph Waltz teamed up with Tarantino again for 2013's "Django Unchained," which featured Waltz and Jamie Foxx as a bounty hunter and freed slave who showed no mercy during their travels. The Weinstein Company Columbia Pictures